Print

Print


One or two quick comments.
One thing to think about is that the real source of limitation in the
record play process has always been in the playback side of things. The
amount of information recorded has always been greater than the playback
systems could retrieve.
I have first hand knowledge of tapes made in the 1950's that had material
well above the 15kHz rated performance of the original recorders. If you
are trying to hear what is actually on the tape there is no substitute for
modern playback electronics and heads. The only reason to use the old
playback electronics is for the euphonic distortions that those electronics
impart. Others may disagree, but I'm of the school of thought that most of
the character of these beloved recordings are baked in at the recording
stage.
Second, the low frequency performance of playback heads has been improved
plenty in the last 60 years. Modern heads with extended response gain you a
whole half an octave of performance.
Finally, with regard to Tom's comments about matching the sound of the LP,
it is a useful reference that the mastering engineer should consult, but
ultimately the remastering should take the aesthetic of the original
recording and apply it to the modern medium with greater resolution and
detail.
As always, YMMV.
All the best,
Mark Donahue


On Thu, Mar 27, 2014 at 3:50 PM, DAVID BURNHAM <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I think what Tom is saying, and I totally agree with him, is that there is
> no virtue in playing a historic tape on an historic transport;  modern
> transports treat the tape far more gently and have much less flutter;
>  however there is every reason to play historic tapes using the original
> restored playback heads and electronics or their equivalents.  If a tape
> was made on a machine capable of recording 18 to 18khz and played back on a
> machine capable of 40 to 40khz you have lost the bottom octave and gained
> an octave which contains no recorded signal.  As I've opined before, any
> tape specs I've seen seem to cover 10 octaves - a situation where the upper
> limit of reproduction is 1,000 times the lower limit.
>
> db
>
>
>