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The 'so' phenomenon is definitely in society at large -- people can't seem
to start any strech of conversation or answer a question without starting
with 'so'.

Gene


On Wed, Mar 12, 2014 at 2:19 AM, Paul Stamler <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On 3/12/2014 10:58 AM, Malcolm Rockwell wrote:
>
>> Finally, there's major television news, which, among other things, can't
>> seem to sync the audio with the video and a person's lips either lead or
>> follow the audio signal. Pathetic, especially for the news.
>>
>
> Not necessarily the news -- I find that *many* television broadcasts have
> the audio out-of-synch with the video. Apparently the networks (including
> PBS, which used to be at the forefront of tech) are sending the audio and
> video from one place to another on different channels, with different
> delays -- or do the A/D converters for video and audio have different
> latencies? In any case, it's annoying.
>
> Going back to radio, I've noticed a linguistic shift happening on NPR
> public affairsprograms (I don't listen to much radio other than NPR): when
> answering a question, interviewees increasingly begin their answer with the
> word "So", even when it's not appropriate. Is this happening on other,
> non-NPR, broadcasts too, or in the society at large?
>
> Peace,
> Paul
>