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On 3/25/2014 7:30 PM, Tom Fine wrote:
>
> You must have sent that message from a "smart" device, or you've taken
> up typing with your tongue! ;)
>
> To your point, that's what I was saying, that I suspect the problems
> Emerick heard were in the audible band, driven by what was happening in
> the ultrasonics, or causing the ultrasonics (that may be more directly
> your point).
>
> I think it's also been shown that a big problem with early CD technology
> was the design of the low-pass filtering on the DAC side of things. If I
> recall, Sony's design did it in the analog realm and sounded particuarly
> "harsh," "brittle" and "metallic." Philips did someting additional in
> the digital realm (I might have it reversed), and their DACs tended to
> sound better, according to reviews of the time. I suspect what people
> were hearing was ringing from the brickwall filter, in the audible bands.

No, you have it right -- Sony did it in the analog realm in the first CD 
players and D/A converters (PCM-F1), while Philips did digital, then 
much milder analog filtering in its players. Sony also did its 
anti-alias filtering in the analog realm, which may account for more 
problems. I didn't hear a digital recording I could stand until Sony 
brought out its second generation of DAT recorders, with 1-bit A/D 
conversion followed by decimation/dithering to a 16-bit word, in about 1991.

My tongue is sore.

Peace,
Paul