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Hmmm... So (har), the latest phenomenon I've noticed is something called 
"creak speak" and it's extremely annoying to me. It is when the 
speaker's voice croaks at the end of a word or phrase. Actually, it's a 
contrivance that is not easy to do. I don't think I've heard the 
newsreaders use it (yet) but I did hear it on an "interview" recently, 
possibly on The Daily Show.
God's hooks!
Malcolm

*******

On 3/12/2014 8:15 AM, Carl Pultz wrote:
> Harry Shearer has been tracking that on Le Show, a segment called "The Sos
> of the Week." It has spread all over - I hear it at work. He also skewers
> NPR with the fictitious Continental Public Radio. (CPR - get it?)
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Gene Baron
> Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 1:47 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Radio voices, was Toothpaste
>
> The 'so' phenomenon is definitely in society at large -- people can't seem
> to start any strech of conversation or answer a question without starting
> with 'so'.
>
> Gene
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 12, 2014 at 2:19 AM, Paul Stamler <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> On 3/12/2014 10:58 AM, Malcolm Rockwell wrote:
>>
>>> Finally, there's major television news, which, among other things,
>>> can't seem to sync the audio with the video and a person's lips
>>> either lead or follow the audio signal. Pathetic, especially for the
> news.
>> Not necessarily the news -- I find that *many* television broadcasts
>> have the audio out-of-synch with the video. Apparently the networks
>> (including PBS, which used to be at the forefront of tech) are sending
>> the audio and video from one place to another on different channels,
>> with different delays -- or do the A/D converters for video and audio
>> have different latencies? In any case, it's annoying.
>>
>> Going back to radio, I've noticed a linguistic shift happening on NPR
>> public affairsprograms (I don't listen to much radio other than NPR):
>> when answering a question, interviewees increasingly begin their
>> answer with the word "So", even when it's not appropriate. Is this
>> happening on other, non-NPR, broadcasts too, or in the society at large?
>>
>> Peace,
>> Paul
>>