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I'm curious as to how designing in that acoustically dead area was 
accomplished.
Malcolm

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On 3/13/2014 5:57 AM, Peter Hirsch wrote:
> Interesting that it states that "dance was the primary program that [new
> Northrop] is designed around". I hope that doesn't mean that it will have
> the acoustics of the Lincoln Center auditorium formerly known as the New
> York State Theater (re-christened for a pair of super-rich, politically
> meddlesome brothers that I'd prefer not credit by name). With the NY City
> Ballet as its original tenant, it was created with a dead area onstage so
> that there would be nothing audible radiating to the audience from the
> dancing. Of course, when the late, lamented, City Opera moved from their
> original home at City Center the singers found themselves trapped in this
> same sonic void. Various tweaks, including some sort of amplification, were
> tried over the years. None particularly successfully.
>
> Hope this hasn't veered too far off-ARSC-topic.
>
> Peter Hirsch
>
>
> On Thu, Mar 13, 2014 at 8:09 AM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>
>> http://www.startribune.com/entertainment/music/232941131.html
>>
>> Northrop Auditorium in Minneapolis was a non-ideal recording venue in the
>> 1950s. Fortunately, Dorati and the Minneapolis Symphony made music good
>> enough to out-shine the inferior hall acoustics. Unfortunately, nearby
>> Edison High School and its good-sounding auditorium weren't discovered
>> until very late in the Mercury-MSO contract.
>>
>> -- Tom Fine