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I didn't realize there was a Victrola Credenza in 1924;  I thought they were introduced in 1925 to coincide with electrical recording. 

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> On Mar 28, 2014, at 8:43 AM, James Roth <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Hello everyone,
> 
> The reason I want to keep this phonograph working is just for demonstrations.
> We already have 3 antique players: 1910 Edison cylinder in working condition; a 1911 Victor Victrola [working]; and a 1924 Victor Credenza [working].
> I would like to find the tonearm just for demonstrations.
> Does anyone know where I can find one?
> 
> Thanks,
> Ben Roth
> http://www.library.fau.edu/depts/spc/spc/soundarchives.htm
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Steve Greene
> Sent: Thursday, March 27, 2014 4:20 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] I don't know what to call it, but I need one.
> 
> That sounds like the tonearm headshell you are describing. Is there some value (other than atmospheric) to this old turntable? It seems like serviceable turntables should be relatively cheap these days.
> 
> Steve Greene
> Audiovisual Archivist
> Office of Presidential Libraries
> National Archives and Records Administration
> (301) 837-1772
> 
> 
>> On Thu, Mar 27, 2014 at 2:25 PM, James Roth <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> Hello everyone,
>> 
>> I just inherited an old portable Ultratone phonograph, made by Audio 
>> Industries.
>> The swinging extension arm(?) (the part that holds the head [with the 
>> needle] broke.
>> It seems to be made of pot metal.  I went to lift it to insert a 
>> needle and it more-or-less crumbled.
>> I have 3 pictures, so if anyone wants to see them, ping me off-line.
>> I'm hoping I can get a replacement.
>> 
>> Thanks.
>> Ben Roth
>>