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Good comment about Reiner and percussion, Don.  Reminds me of his fantastic
recording of Johann Strauss, Jr.'s Thunder and Lightning Polka, which is a
subwoofer demo *par excellence*, especially on the SACD.  I didn't realize
he also added tympani parts where not written.  Can you think of any
examples?

Best,
John Haley


On Mon, May 5, 2014 at 8:47 PM, Steve Smolian <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I love that Prokofiev piano recording.   It's enthusiatically played by a
> true believer in the piece.  It just about leaps out of the speakers.
>  Great record.
>
> Steve Smolian.
>
> -----Original Message----- From: Donald Tait
> Sent: Monday, May 05, 2014 8:07 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Dora Labbette, Soprano with string quartette: The
> Flowers of the Forests, 1925?
>
>  Reiner also studied percussion as a student in Budapest. Including
> timpani, which might help explain the added prominence of and occasional
> added timpani parts in his CSO recordings (it's harder to tell with his
> Pittsburgh and other recordings). I remember talking to Sam Denov, who was
> then a retired member of the Chicago Symphony's percussion section. He said
> "Reiner was DEATH on percussion." Meaning that he not only heard
> everything, which was a given, but that he knew exactly what he wanted and
> wouldn't settle until he got it. Sam was speaking from his personal CSO
> experience....
>
>  Also, Reiner made piano rolls in 1925 et seq. Four-hand versions in which
> he was credited as being one of the two pianists and others in which he was
> credited as the "conductor." Philip Hart wrote about it on page 44 of his
> biography of Reiner.
>
>  Don Tait
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: John Haley <[log in to unmask]>
> To: ARSCLIST <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Mon, May 5, 2014 8:50 am
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Dora Labbette, Soprano with string quartette: The
> Flowers of the Forests, 1925?
>
>
> I just looked up Fiedler in Wiki, and while born in Boston, his parents
> moved to Europe (Vienna and Berlin) and he studied violin with Willy Hess
> at the Berlin Hochschule.  I didn't see mention of the Johann Strauss III's
> orchestra, but that is possible.  I might be wrong about his playing the
> viola.  Monteux was a violist, and both Reiner and Mitropoulos were
> pianists.  We have a recording of Mitropoulos performing and conducting a
> Prokofiev concerto.
>
> Best,
> John Haley
>
>
> On Mon, May 5, 2014 at 9:23 AM, Roger Kulp <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
>  Szell,Walter,Solti,and Bernstein all made very famous recordings as
>> pianists.I have seen it reported that Fiedler played in Johann Strauss
>> III's orchestra as a student.Is there any truth to this?
>>
>> Roger
>>
>> > Date: Sun, 4 May 2014 12:45:19 -0400
>> > From: [log in to unmask]
>> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Dora Labbette, Soprano with string quartette:
>> The Flowers of the Forests, 1925?
>> > To: [log in to unmask]
>> >
>> > I believe Fiedler (whose name means "fiddler") was also a violist.  But
>> the
>> > violists are in good company with composers.  Beethoven, Rossini and
>> Mozart
>> > all played the viola, I believe, altho both Beethoven and Mozart had
>> > performing careers as pianists.  Most of the famous violinists of the
>> 19th
>> > Century, and before, were also composers.
>> >
>> > Best, John
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > On Sun, May 4, 2014 at 11:41 AM, Dave Burnham <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>> >
>> > > You're right. And an inordinate number were cellists, the ones you
>> mention
>> > > along with Kindler, Bourdon, Casals and Rostropovich. I think
>> Hindemith did
>> > > some conducting as well which would fill out the picture by including
>> > > a
>> > > violist.
>> > >
>> > > db
>> > >
>> > > Sent from my iPhone
>> > >
>> > > > On May 4, 2014, at 10:48 AM, John Haley <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>> > > >
>> > > > Most of the great conductors were/are in fact string players, not
>> > > pianists.
>> > > > Szell, Walter, Solti and Bernstein were pianists, and Stokowski was
>> an
>> > > > organist (his first job in the US was as organist for St. Bart's
>> Church
>> > > in
>> > > > Manhattan).  Most of the rest were string players.  Munch was a
>> > > > concertmaster under Furtwaengler.  Toscanini and Barbirolli were
>> > > cellists.
>> > > > Koussevitzsky was a bass fiddle virtuoso.  Ormandy was the most
>> famous
>> > > > violin student of Hubay, Szigeti's teacher.
>> > > >
>> > > > Best,
>> > > > John Haley
>> > > >
>> > > >
>> > > >
>> > > >
>> > > > On Sun, May 4, 2014 at 4:42 AM, Nick Morgan <
>> > > > [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> > > >
>> > > >> I suppose most conductors trained before orchestral recording > >
>> >> became
>> > > >> widespread must have been able to - does anyone know of any that
>> > > couldn't?
>> > > >>
>> > > >> Nick
>> > > >> -----Original Message-----
>> > > >> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
>> > > >> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Dave Burnham
>> > > >> Sent: 04 May 2014 04:11
>> > > >> To: [log in to unmask]
>> > > >> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Dora Labette, Soprano with string
>> quartette: The
>> > > >> Flowers of the Forests, 1925?
>> > > >>
>> > > >> I recently came across a record by Dora Labette with Beecham at the
>> > > piano;
>> > > >> never realized he could play the piano.
>> > > >>
>> > > >> db
>> > > >>
>> > >
>>
>>
>>