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Although of minor relevance to the thread, Stoki added xylophone to his
arrangement of Handel's "Water Music" which he recorded for Victor in, I
think, 1927.
That would be heresy these days, but I found the effect quite novel and
musical.

David N. "Uncle Dave" Lewis
Lebanon, OH


On Tue, May 6, 2014 at 7:53 PM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> Related to this discussion:
>
> In the December 1958 issue of Hi-Fi Review:
> http://tinyurl.com/lcsjutn
>
> There is an article by Colin McPhee about the music of Bali. Photos show
> drums and other native instruments.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jack McCarthy" <
> [log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Tuesday, May 06, 2014 7:18 PM
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Stokowski and percussion instruments
>
>
>
>  In 2012-13 I served as consulting archivist for the Philadelphia
>> Orchestra's
>> celebration of the centennial of its hiring of Stokowski as conductor. In
>> the PO archives I came across a letter from Stoki during his 1928 Asia
>> trip
>> in which he informs the PO that in Java he had purchased four Javanese
>> gongs
>> and was shipping them to the Orchestra. I was later able to track the
>> gongs
>> down - they are owned by the Curtis Institute.
>>
>> Eichheim, who traveled with Stoki for part of the trip, also composed a
>> piece entitled "Java" that Stoki premiered with the PO in 1930. It called
>> for tuned gongs. I presume they used the ones Stoki had purchased.
>>
>> For an exhibit I did as part of the centennial celebration, I was able to
>> display Stoki's letter, two of the actual gongs, and the program from the
>> 1930 performance of "Java."
>>
>>
>> Jack McCarthy
>> Certified Archivist
>> Archival/Historical Consultant
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Carl Pultz
>> Sent: Tuesday, May 06, 2014 8:10 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Dora Labbette, Soprano with string quartette: The
>> Flowers of the Forests, 1925?
>>
>> I'm rereading Oliver Daniel's "Stokowski." He tells about Stoki's
>> Asia/south
>> seas trip in the 20s when the conductor studied percussion with Indian
>> physicist Jagadis Bose and collected instruments. Eichheim's "Bali" stems
>> from this journey, which Stoki later recorded. Some of those instruments
>> may
>> have ended up on his famous recording of "Gurrelieder." It was an enduring
>> interest, as well into the 50s he was playing percussion works by
>> Harrison,
>> et al, and premiered McPhee's Tabuh-Tabuhan in 1953.
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Donald Tait
>> Sent: Monday, May 05, 2014 8:08 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Dora Labbette, Soprano with string quartette: The
>> Flowers of the Forests, 1925?
>>
>>  Reiner also studied percussion as a student in Budapest. Including
>> timpani, which might help explain the added prominence of and occasional
>> added timpani parts in his CSO recordings (it's harder to tell with his
>> Pittsburgh and other recordings). I remember talking to Sam Denov, who was
>> then a retired member of the Chicago Symphony's percussion section. He
>> said
>> "Reiner was DEATH on percussion." Meaning that he not only heard
>> everything,
>> which was a given, but that he knew exactly what he wanted and wouldn't
>> settle until he got it. Sam was speaking from his personal CSO
>> experience....
>>
>>  Also, Reiner made piano rolls in 1925 et seq. Four-hand versions in which
>> he was credited as being one of the two pianists and others in which he
>> was
>> credited as the "conductor." Philip Hart wrote about it on page 44 of his
>> biography of Reiner.
>>
>>  Don Tait
>>
>>
>>