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> I'm guessing this might be
> the show:
> 
> http://annarborchronicle.com/2008/11/09/a-golden-age-of-jazz-revisited/
> 
> 
> A Golden Age
> of Jazz Revisited
> BY HAZEN SCHUMACHER
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5MZ4XD_AIc
> 
> Used to listen 'until I
> went out and bought the records that I liked.'
> 
> 
> Gene
> 












--- On Sun, 5/25/14, eugene hayhoe <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> From: eugene hayhoe <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Public radio was Re: Future of CDs
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Date: Sunday, May 25, 2014, 9:09 AM
> " I wish I could
> recall the name of that came
> > from one
> of the public radio networks and, each week, featured
> vintage jazz
> > and big band recordings -
> I recall one whole episode was just devoted to
> > V-Discs"
> 
> 
> --------------------------------------------
> On Sun, 5/25/14, Frank Strauss <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> 
>  Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST]
> Public radio was Re: Future of CDs
>  To: [log in to unmask]
>  Date: Sunday, May 25, 2014, 12:15 AM
>  
>  I also like the ability
>  to change genre of music with SiriusXM. The
> OTR
>  station definitely isn't
> particularly
>  enlightened, but given good
> fortune
>  in the
>  luck of the
> programming draw, it can sure help a long car
>  trip be
>  more enjoyable.  I
> force my wife to
>  negotiate with them every
> year to get a
>  better rate.  She out did
> herself this
>  year-the full version for both
> of
>  our cars
>  for $100 a
> year each. I used to give more than that to the
>  local
>  FM Classical NPR
> station.  I went
>  over and manned a phone
> during pledge
>  time.  Now it seems like
> almost every week
>  they take away the music
> so they
>  can have a
>  fund
> raising event.  No doubt they are doing a Memorial Day
>  fund
>  raiser.  They do
> Mother's Day and
>  Valentine's Day
> and Christmas and
>  Thanksgiving, and God
> knows what else.  The
>  scripted repetitive
> nonsense
>  they broadcast
> 
> during these events makes one assume they think we are
>  all
>  morons.  If you added up
> all the
>  regular full Monty fund drives,
> the
>  special
>  event fund
> drives and the 10 second commercials, there is
>  far more
>  down time, with
> little or no music,
>  than any of the
> commercial stations.
>  Both of
>  the local NPR stations make you listen to 20
> seconds of
>  commercial
> 
> every time you tune in the
>  streaming
> version.   I often wondered if the
>  FM
>  stations couldn't let me pay an
>  annual fee, and then allow me to listen
>  without the fundraising drivel.  Maybe
>  something that accesses the extra
>  band
>  width, like their
> service for the visually impaired.  I
>  have
> also
>  wished that they would spend less
>  money on their syndicated programming,
>  and
>  just play classical
> music, maybe from their own library,
>  like
> they used
>  to. Interesting to note that
>  Robert Aubry Davis, one of the XM Sirius
>  Symphony Hall announcers, used to be at our
>  local station in upstate New
> 
> York. I am very
>  pessimistic about the
> future of classical FM in my area,
>  and I
> guess I wouldn't miss them much. 
>  Too
> bad.
>  
>  
> 
> On
>  Sat, May 24, 2014 at 11:13 PM, Randy A.
> Riddle <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>  
>  > I listened to public
>  radio for many years.  I think what happened
> was that
>  > it lost track of its original
> vision to
>  educate.
>  >
>  > The
>  public radio
> stations in my area are basically running many
>  of the same
>  > talk or
> music series that
>  have been around since
> the 1980s.  There doesn't
>  > seem to
> be anything there I've not
>  heard before
> or seen around the
>  >
> 
> Internet.
>  >
>  > For
> me,
>  public radio was at its best in the
> 1970s when it acted as a
>  kind
>  > of curator for the best or most
>  interesting in what was happening in
>  >
>  serious music or the
> arts.  It was the place you would turn
>  to
> to hear new
>  > classical works or new
>  recordings of classical music, experiments in
> radio
>  > drama, or what was happening in
> music
>  scholarship.
>  >
>  > A
>  good example is a
> weekly show I wish I could recall the name
> 
> of that came
>  > from one of the public
>  radio networks and, each week, featured
> vintage jazz
>  > and big band recordings -
> I recall one
>  whole episode was just devoted
> to
>  >
>  V-Discs.
>  >
>  > At other
>  times, my local public radio stations featured
> regular
>  broadcasts
>  > of
> classic Old Time Radio -
>  Suspense, the
> Great Gildersleeve, Jack Benny
>  > and
> other programs.
>  >
>  >
> Sure, much of this
>  material is available
> now on the Internet or satellite
>  > radio
> stations.  Public radio could find
>  its
> voice again by being a curator
>  > and
>  gateway into what's worth my time, rather
> than being
>  either background
>  > classical Muzak for a
> 
> day at the office or offering the "comfort
> food"
>  of
>  >
> "Prairie Home
>  Companion". 
> It's just stale.
>  >
> 
> > I like Sirius XM
>  because it allows me
> to sample genres of music that I
>  >
> don't know much about or listen deeper
> 
> into a genre catalogue to figure out
> 
> >
>  what I might like or not like - the
> same thing that public
>  and college
>  > radio used to do for me
> 
> many years ago.
>  >
> 
> >
>  The OTR channel is a little
> conservative for my taste,
>  repeating many
> of
>  > the same "war
> 
> horses" that I've heard many times before, but
> at
>  least it's
>  >
> something.
>  >
>  >
> Randy
>  >
>  >
>  --
>  
>  Frank B
> Strauss, DMD
>