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(For some reason °Google Mail" is marking a /LOT/ of ARSClist mails as spam
now too - more than any mailing list and it never used to be).

This message (to which I was replying) was the last of five ARSClist mails
that went to the spam folder overnight.

Darren / Music Library Finland


¦ D P Ingram




On 8 May 2014 19:26, Don Tait ([log in to unmask]) <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> . As for "except for Bruno Walter" there wasn't much interest in  Mahler
> before World War II, Willem Mengelberg programmed and conducted Mahler
>  almost
> incessantly before the Nazis forbade him to do so, including with the New
> York Philharmonic between 1922/3 and 1930 and his 1920 Mahler Festival in
> Amsterdam; Frederick Stock conducted Mahler symphonies with the Chicago
> Symphony  as early as the 1906/7 season (Symphony no. 5) and 1930/1 and
> 1931/2
> (Symphony  no. 7); and so on.
>
>   Don Tait
>
>
> In a message dated 5/8/2014 10:03:29 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
> [log in to unmask] writes:
>
> Mahler  was played in the U.S. long before WW2. Recordings began with an
> acoustic  "Resurrection" on Polydor. Japanese Columbia had a recording of
> the Fourth  in 1929. Ormandy recorded the "Resurrection" for Victor in
> Minneapolis in  1935. Walter did both DAS LIED and the Ninth Symphony in
> Vienna in the  latter thirties.The Mahler First with Mitropoulos was also
> done in  Minneapolis.
>
> DDR
>
>
> On Thu, May 8, 2014 at 10:19 AM, Roger Kulp
> <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>
> > Aside from the very  obvious exception of Bruno Walter,I don't believe
> > there was much  interest in Mahler before WWII.The 1940 (?) Dimitri
> > Mitropolous Mahler  with the NYPO is the only recording before the
> postwar
> > period I am  aware of.
> >
> > Roger
> >
> > > Date: Thu, 8 May 2014  07:58:46 -0400
> > > From: [log in to unmask]
> > > Subject: Re:  [ARSCLIST] Stokowski and percussion instruments
> > > To:  [log in to unmask]
> > >
> > > David’s quite right, I  think, that Beecham never recorded (and
> probably
> > never conducted)  Bruckner or Mahler, but in his time not many conductors
> > outside of  Germany did (Toscanini never conducted Mahler, whose music he
> > hated,  and did only a couple of Bruckner symphonies, once or twice;
> there
> ’s
> > a  NY Phil recording of the Seventh, missing chunks at change of record).
> >  Beecham was a champion of Richard Strauss when Strauss was controversial
>  —
> > I think he conducted the British premieres of Salome (censored,  though
> to
> > his horror some of the singers reverted to the original  language; nobody
> > else noticed) and maybe Elektra, symphonies by Kurt  Atterberg and of
> course
> > he was a great champion of Delius.
> >  >
> > > I think he did conduct some Stravinsky in the teens or 20s  when
> Monteux
> > (who was supposed to do it) fell ill, but I don’t think  he liked it
> much,
> > and he definitely wasn’t fond of the music of  Schoenberg and Webern. And
> > yes, his Wagner was pretty impressive —  rumors are still around that
> > there’s a complete Ring from Covent  Garden (the end of Act I and much of
> > Act II has been released, and of  course the stunning Hagen’s Watch with
> > Ludwig Weber in his prime)  lurking somewhere in the EMI archives or
> maybe
> > the collection of Lord  Harewood.
> > >
> > > On May 8, 2014, at 12:00 AM, ARSCLIST  automatic digest system <
> > [log in to unmask]>  wrote:
> > >
> > > > From:    Clark Johnsen  <[log in to unmask]>
> > > > Subject: Re: Stokowski and  percussion instruments
> > > >
> > > > What about Wagner?  Beecham left a complete recording of Tristan,
> much
> > of
> > >  > Meistersinger, and numerous excerpts that are all done in grand
> style.
> > > > According to Wiki he performed all the operas except  Parsifal
> numerous
> > > > times and to great  acclaim.
> >
>
>
>
>
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