Print

Print


Also Edd Kalehoff had a lot to do with East Coast commercial use and
signature sounds.




> On Sunday, June 22, 2014, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
>> I'm very much enjoying this book, and definitely recommend it:
>> http://www.amazon.com/Analog-Days-Invention-Impact-
>> Synthesizer/dp/0674016173/tomslinx
>>
>> I've found it very interesting to find the early synth recordings on
>> YouTube and listen as I read the related text in the book. Very educational
>> to me is the different styles that emerged almost immediately on the two
>> coasts. To hear the contrasts, I recommeding finding YouTubes of the
>> following:
>>
>> West Coast - "The Zodiac - Cosmic Sounds" and "The Nonesuch Guide To
>> Electronic Music." These feature the work of Paul Beaver and Bernard
>> Krause, the West Coast pioneers of the Moog synthesizer. Also of interest
>> are Morton Subotnick's works on the Buchla syth, also the Buchla-influenced
>> stuff that came out of the Tape Recording Lab in San Francisco.
>>
>> East Coast - Walter Sear was Bob Moog's first distributor and was
>> influential in Moog's development of the synthesizer. Sear and Walter/Wendy
>> Carlos were the first NYC-based Moog users and programmers. "Switched On
>> Bach" by Carlos was probably the most famous early synth album Columbia
>> also made "Switched On Rock" to glom off the success. Walter Sear worked
>> mainly with Command Records, making one album of his own and programming
>> the Moog for Dick Hyman (2 albums) and Richard Hayman (1 album). Walter's
>> Moog effects were also used on numerous comemrcials and sound-for-picture
>> projects.
>>
>> An interesting thing that both Beaver and Krause and Sear say in the book
>> is that, very soon after certain Moog sounds they had programmed were used
>> on a few successful recordings, those were the sounds everyone wanted. Paul
>> Beaver got very frustrated that it came down to 30-50 sounds, and no one
>> wanted to experiment any further. The curious thing, to my ears, is that
>> Beaver and Krause got a different few dozen sounds that took hold in L.A.
>> and Hollywood, vs the sounds Sear came up with that took hold in NYC.
>> There's a bit of crossover, but there are distinct differences. I think all
>> of this went away when program pre-sets and automation came along, then
>> everyone could copy the same sounds on any device. Nowadays it's almost all
>> "virtual," and the possibilities are actually wider, but it's the same set
>> of sounds.
>>
>> -- Tom Fine
>>
>>
>
> --
> best
> seva
>
> [log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>
> www.soundcurrent.com
>
>
>
>