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Mid-48 sounds much more plausible - the first use of tape at Abbey Road 
was in '48, at Decca mid-'49, for the launch of London LPs. According to 
Pawley (BBC), there were three prototype EMI BTR-1s by February '48. The 
47-48 season of Crosby shows was done on the Magnetophons with the IG 
Farben stock used over and over again, so the story goes.




On 31/07/2014 12:45, Carl Pultz wrote:
> The question of Columbia Records' adoption of new technologies came up here
> recently. By coincidence, I came across a memoir of the development of LP by
> Edward Wallerstein. According to this, the company had started recording to
> 33rpm 16" vinyl discs in the late 30s, which later helped them to create
> quiet masters for LP. But, additionally, they were early into tape:
>
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> "Columbia also had an advantage in that we were the first people in the U.S.
> to use tape for master recording. [Adrian] Murphy was one of the first to
> see a German Magnetophon tape recorder in newly liberated Luxemburg after
> the war. He quickly packed it up and shipped it back to CBS. Not long
> thereafter both EMI and Ampex came out with machines, and we immediately
> placed an order for both. By mid-1947, we were using them and had
> discontinued direct disc cutting. The Ampex proved to be the better machine,
> so we sent the EMI machines back. Of the originally issued LPs about 40%
> were from tape originals."
>
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>
> Interesting essay, though how reliable I'm not sure. (For instance, how much
> mag tape was available in mid-47? I think Mullin was still hording scraps of
> BASF at that time.) It has probably appeared elsewhere, but I found it here:
>
>   
>
> http://www.musicinthemail.com/audiohistoryLP.html via
> http://wallyheider.com/wordpress/
>
>   
>
>   
>
> Carl Pultz
>
> Alembic Productions
>