Print

Print


Pierre Henry is on here.Henry has been extremely influential figure in everything from progressive rock to hip hop to experimental music for nearly fifty years.Henry is of course best known for the music he wrote for Michel Colombier's 1967 ballet <<Les Jerks Électroniques De La Messe Pour Le Temps Present>> ,that included a piece called "Psyche Rock" ,which was later mined for the theme song for the series Futurama.Henry later said this was based on Wild Thing by The Troggs.Henry also collaborated with Spooky Tooth on their 1969 album Ceremony.|||Henry has been heavily sampled by rappers,club DJs,and assorted electronica artists.http://www.whosampled.com/Pierre-Henry/|||A pretty much complete discography can be found at http://home.comcast.net/~ed_maurer/PierreHenry/||I have a few of his Philips LPs.They are well worth seeking out,and becoming very collectible.|||Roger   > Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 10:47:34 -0400> From: [log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Richard Maxfield Collection now streaming online> To: [log in to unmask]> > Hi David:> > Related to this thread ...> > Mercury in the late 60's put out a 2LP album that apparently came from French Philips, featuring > electronic music from Europe.> > SR2-9123:> http://tinyurl.com/mu8benu> > This appears to be pre-Moog/pre-Buchla music made with tape and various electronic noise-makers.> > I don't follow club music, but I wonder if these old electronic music LPs get sampled often? There > are some very unique sounds on them.> > A book I am reading, "Analog Days" by Trevor Pinch and Frank Trocco:> http://www.amazon.com/Analog-Days-Invention-Impact-Synthesizer/dp/0674016173/tomslinx> talks about how the early Moog and Buchla artists came up with all sorts of far-out sounds, but > later synth players settled on a relatively small sub-set of the machines' capabilities (exemplified > by the popularity of the Minimoog).  In the world of sound effects, there seems to be a recent > return to recording real-world sounds and then layering them into desired compound audio using DAW > editing and sound-altering capabilities. In the early days of synthesis, the move was toward using > something like the Moog to create and layer completely electronic sounds and using them as effects > audio.> > -- Tom Fine> > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "David Lewis" <[log in to unmask]>> To: <[log in to unmask]>> Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 10:17 AM> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Richard Maxfield Collection now streaming online> > > > Jonathan,> >> > Thank you for this treasure trove. As you would be well aware, very little> > of Maxfield ever made it out into the public ear, including only one piece> > in his lifetime ("Night Piece" on the 1967 Odyssey LP "New Sounds in> > Electronic Music.") When I saw your link, I immediately reached out to my> > friend Mark Milano, who has been studying/collecting non-European early> > electronic and minimalist music for close to 30 years. He wrote:> >> > "Wow ! I just picked up a new double LP of his music, and now this ! After> > all these 50+ years since he got started there was only one album and one> > other track, I certainly didn't see this deluge coming.> >> > The double album contains interviews and pieces for conventional> > instruments and about 18 minutes of tape music, so these pieces are not> > duplicates and very welcome to say the least."> >> > Maxfield is someone we've all wondered about for a long time: what he did> > versus what his colleagues said he did, what he might have done had he> > survived> > the 'sixties. You have helped to open the door to that much wider. Thank> > you!> >> > David Neal Lewis> > North Plainfield, NJ> >> >> > On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 5:20 PM, Jonathan Manton <[log in to unmask]>> > wrote:> >> >> --Apologies for cross posting--> >>> >> The Archive of Recorded Sound at Stanford University is delighted to> >> announce that the Richard Maxfield Collection (ARS.0074) can now be> >> listened to online, via the collection's finding aid on the Online Archive> >> of California http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt6q2nf5jm/.> >>> >> This collection features nine distinct works by the pioneering American> >> electronic music composer Richard Maxfield, composed between 1959-1964,> >> four of which are believed to be previously unpublished (Dromenom,> >> Electronic Symphony, Suite from Peripateia, and Wind). Additionally, as> >> Maxfield frequently produced unique edits of his work for each performance,> >> many of the open tape reels that form this collection include alternative> >> edits to those previously published, such as the tapes for Amazing Grace> >> which feature three different versions of the work.> >>> >> You can read more about Maxfield and this collection on the Stanford> >> Libraries Blog -> >> http://library.stanford.edu/blogs/stanford-libraries-blog/2014/07/richard-maxfield-collection-now-streaming-online> >> .> >>> >> Jonathan Manton> >> Sound Archives Librarian> >> Archive of Recorded Sound> >>> >> Braun Music Center> >> Stanford University> >> 541 Lasuen Mall> >> Stanford, CA 94305-3076> >>> >> 650-725-8862> >> 650-725-1145 (fax)> >>> >> Please consider the environment and data security before printing this> >> email> >>> >> >