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Well whatever.  A Kuntzkopf (sp?), recording sounds very confusing on speakers but has astonishing realism when heard on a headset; but going the other way "normal" stereo generally sounds just fine on a headset.  But if you listen to a coincident mike pick-up on a headset the soundstage is in the middle of your head, since there is none of the time differences the ears need to locate sounds outside your head.  When you listen to a coincident pick-up on speakers the soundstage is a curtain of sound eminating from the entire area between the speakers, the speaker positions presenting the required time differences, (unless the source is a single instrument or singer from a single position).  

The terms always worked for me and I assume the two terms were introduced because speaker listening and head phone listening ideally have two different aural requirements so should have two different names.  Binaural is an obvious outgrowth of monaural.  I'm always tempted to say that it's just like 3-D movies and regular movies but we all know that that comparison is weak.  Although there is the similarity that you can watch any movie through 3-D glasses but the regular movie gains nothing.

There was also the term, "Duophonic", which, to me, means electronic stereo from a mono source, but I guess the custom could have developed to use that term for Stereo as well.


db


On Thursday, September 4, 2014 9:44:13 AM, Don Cox <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
 

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>On 04/09/2014, Tom Fine wrote:
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>> This is true. The Mercury team referred to all the 2-mic experimental
>> recordings as "binaural" to separate them as a class from "stereo"
>> 3-channel recordings. Because thrre-track tapes were lost in a handful
>> of cases, the "binaural" edited master was what was used for the CD.
>> If I remember correctly it's fewer than 5 cases, maybe only 1 or 2.
>> (There are other cases where the 2-track tape recorded from the live
>> 3-2 mix when the LP was cut was used, again because the 3-track master
>> was lost, only a handful of those cases too).
>> 
>> I think, in the early stereo days, only Emory Cook consistently
>> recorded true "binaural" tapes, in other words those designed to be
>> listened to through headphones only.
>> 
>"Srereo" is really a misnomer, as it should refer to depth (distance
>from the listener), not to width.
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>The difference between a stereo photograph and a flat one is that it
>records distance.
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>Regards
>-- 
>Don Cox
>[log in to unmask]
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