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I'm not sure about the rotational speed being faster in a computer drive than in a CD player; the rotational speed is determined by the cd itself - rotating much faster at the beginning of a CD than at the end, (ca 500rpm down to ca 200rpm).

The original subject line was "CD time limit".  I assume you're talking only about CDRs.  Commercial CDs can carry more than 80 minutes.  One example that comes to mind is Gergiev's recording of Tchaikovsky's "Nutcracker Ballet" on Philips, it is almost 82 minutes.

db


On Monday, September 8, 2014 9:59 PM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
 

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>Peter, I agree with Ellis and Paul about this -- try ripping the CD to your computer and either 
>playing from the hard drive or burning another copy. Clean the CD first (Ellis is correct about 
>fingerprints). As one who has bought many yard-sale and dollar-bin used CDs over the years, I have 
>found that many discs which won't play in an audio CD player (especially an old one) will rip to WAV 
>or FLAC just fine in my Plextor Pro computer DVD/CD drive (now about 10 years old, so it's no spring 
>chicken either). I use dBPowerAmp's CD Ripper program, which connects to the AccuRip database and 
>tells me if any tracks don't match that data. That happens rarely, and many times those tracks still 
>playback just fine or maybe with one digital pop that I can do in and remove in Soundforge (in other 
>words one tiny part of a track couldn't get error-corrected, which shows up as either a mute or more 
>commonly as a near-zero dB spike, which I just hand-write out of the waveform like a sharp tick on 
>an LP record).
>
>In the case of your CD, first clean it carefully, especially the edges. Then, handle it only on the 
>rim. Then, try ripping it to WAV on your computer.
>
>-- Tom Fine
>
>----- Original Message ----- 
>From: "Ellis Burman" <[log in to unmask]>
>To: <[log in to unmask]>
>Sent: Sunday, September 07, 2014 2:09 AM
>Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] CD time limit
>
>
>> Hi Peter.  CDs are recorded inside to outside, so a super long CD such as
>> the one you describe has data at the very outer edge of the disc (you
>> should be able to see this data if you hold the disc up to a light). The
>> outer edge is where the disc is handled, so fingerprints and dirt can be a
>> problem, as well as any slight mechanical deformation in the disc.  Your
>> computer's DVD burner spins the disc at high speed, which may help flatten
>> it out somewhat if it is slightly warped.  Also, the computer's error
>> correction might be more robust than that of your CD player.
>>
>> Best,
>>
>> Ellis Burman
>> www.burmansound.com
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Sep 6, 2014 at 9:52 PM, Peter Hirsch <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> I am listening to a recording of Morton Feldman's Piano and string quartet
>>> on a Bridge CD (catalog no. 9369). This piece clocks in at 79:13 and is
>>> recorded as a single track of that length. The sound drops out from time to
>>> time for a moment, which leads me to wonder if the unusual length of the
>>> disc and track is a factor have listened to this disc on my computer's CD
>>> drive without these dropouts.
>>>
>>> Can someone give a lucid, brief, explanation of what causes the dropouts
>>> and why the results are different on my computer and CD player?
>>>
>>> Curious as ever,
>>>
>>> Peter Hirsch
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -- 
>> Ellis
>> [log in to unmask]
>> 818-846-5525
>>
>> 
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