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If you make a recording booth, you might learn from past bad ideas and make sure it's heavily damped 
so it doesn't sound like the performers are inside a cardboard box. While I understand the novelty 
cachet of this trend of using ancient disk recorders to cut one-off lacquers of modern performers, I 
think purposely using outmoded and low-fidelity methods is silly. If I were doing this, I would at 
least use a better microphone than was available for these things in the 1940s, and would try to 
improve the electronics and the cutting stylus, if possible and practical. And, if I were the 
performers, I would insist that a high-fidelity digital recorder with good modern mics is running at 
the same time in case I hit a once-in-a-career performace by accident. It would be terrible to have 
someone bring their A+ game for that one day and have it captured by an old low-fi antique.

-- Tom Fine


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Michael Biel" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 1:03 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] recording booths


> You might check with Rainbo records in Santa Barbara.  They used to make
> most of the discs that were used in these machines.  And look up
> Mutoscope.  There also was an Empire State Building recording booth that
> was not only in the Empire State building.  It was similar.  Indeed, the
> main problem might be getting blank discs because a regular aluminum
> base lacquer disc won't work. It crimps dimples in the label area of the
> discs to keep the disc in place.  Discs were fibre base or thin
> aluminum.
>
> Mike Biel  [log in to unmask]
>
>
> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] recording booths
> From: Lorna Fulton <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Wed, September 17, 2014 10:16 am
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> Many thanks- this is a great start! If anyone knows of any research /
> publications as well, that would be brilliant!
>
>
> Lorna Fulton
> e: [log in to unmask]
> t:
> + 44 (0) 7771 692971
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 17/09/2014 10:55, "CJB" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>>Google in your friend ...
>>
>>http://retrodundee.blogspot.co.uk/2011/03/railway-recording-booths-1960s.h
>>tml
>>
>>http://www.dinosaursandrobots.com/2008/11/mutoscope-voice-o-graph-coin-ope
>>rated.html
>>
>>http://wcardoneproductions.com/blog/2013/the-voice-o-graph-recording-booth
>>s-of-the-1940s/
>>
>>http://www.dhrecordings.com/dhr_malls.html
>>
>>http://www.skooldays.com/categories/arcade/ag1271.htm
>>
>>etc., etc.
>>
>>On 17/09/2014, Lorna Fulton <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> Hi, I'm new to this list, so forgive me if this question has been
>>>answered
>>> before!
>>> I'm based in the UK and doing a project recording contemporary
>>>musicians on
>>> a 78 presto lathe- one mic, one take, one cut. We're then building this
>>> into
>>> a contemporary archive. The majority of the musicians are those who play
>>> traditionally inspired music (recently recorded Sheesham & Lotus & son
>>> (Toronto) and the lost brothers (Ireland)).
>>> We're looking to further develop the project by building a traditional
>>> recording booth- of the voice o graph type- the ones which used to be
>>> around
>>> in the 40s-60s, which would then travel around cities, placed where the
>>>old
>>> recording booths used to be, where the public could record a record, and
>>> there would be a range of performances from musicians we have worked
>>>with.
>>>
>>> I've already been in touch with the British Library and the British
>>>Sound
>>> Archive looking for any archival/historical information on these
>>>recording
>>> booths, but they have been unable to find anything, so referred me to
>>>this
>>> list. I know Jack White has a voice o graph in his studio, but aside
>>>from
>>> that, am finding it very hard to find out anything about their history-
>>>if
>>> anyone could help, that would be brilliant!
>>> Thank you!
>>> Lorna Fulton
>>> e: [log in to unmask]
>>> t: + 44 (0) 7771 692971
>>>
>
>