Print

Print


Wow, kewl! Thanks for the link.

By the time I was in grade school, in the 70s, they were using a device with a solid-state 
oscillator and hard plastic "earphones" (what we'd call headphones today). The school nurse would 
run a series of tones and we'd raise hand if we heard them, and then another series of tone raise 
the hand matching the ear in which we heard it. I always wondered if the headphones were capable of 
putting out the same SPL's at each frequency, or if the test was inaccurate from the get-go.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Jolyon S Hudson" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, September 25, 2014 12:53 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Columbia Record set


> The answer to your set seems to be at this link - the summary seems to explain
> the function of the set.
>
> http://archotol.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=546479
>
> 'The introduction of the phonograph audiometer1 (Western Electric No. 4-A) made
> possible the testing of the hearing of a large number of persons at one time. This
> instrument is now used in many cities for the examination of school children.'
>
> Jolyon
>
>