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PCCLIST readers,

Here is the situation with regard to townships in Virginia.  A search in Connexion for NARs  (kw:township va) retrieved 27 records, only one of which, n  88295900, is for a township: Rivanna (Va. : Township).  This field is present:

670  Ray, S.R. Preliminary guide to pre-1904 county records, 1987: ǂb p. xxiii (Constitution of 1869 set up township offices in Va.; residents of townships elected various officials and legislation further provided for board of supervisors and clerk; system was abolished in 1875, although county divisions were carried forward as magisterial districts)

The situation in Ohio is somewhat different, more like that in Michigan.  I'm grateful to Chris Baer for the phrase "doughnut hole", which represents the situation from where I write: the City of Marion,  enclosed within Marion Township, one of fifteen townships in Marion County, and one of nine named "Marion Township" in various counties in Ohio.  The township website http://www.mariontwp.org/Pages/default.aspx has  "Welcome to the Marion Township, Marion,Ohio website".  Notice that the city name is given but not the word county.

However, it would not occur to me intuitively  to seek out or create a heading formulated:
Marion (Marion County, Ohio : Township)
although we're told to do so, thus:
•       Do not include the term “township” or “town” as part of the name. Instead, add the term after the name of the state.
•       PS lists states that have these non-local jurisdictions and whether they are called “towns” or “townships”
•       Apply LC-PCC PS for 16.2.2.12 if more than one township with same name in same state
in Module 5, "Describing Places", slide 58 "LC-PCC PS for 16.4", available via http://www.loc.gov/catworkshop/courses/naco-RDA/index.html

Instructors' notes for that slide conveniently read as below.  Perhaps liberal use of variant access points will alleviate any distress among those who will never understand why Marion Township is treated as though people call it Marion.

Sincerely - Ian

Ian Fairclough
Cataloging and Metadata Services Librarian
George Mason University Libraries
[log in to unmask]

_______________________________
U.S. Townships
For U.S. townships (called “towns” in some states) that encompass one or more local communities and the surrounding territory, do not include the term “township” or “town” as part of the name. Instead, add the term after the name of the state.

EXAMPLE
BGN GNIS: Kintire, Township of
151 ## $a Kintire (Minn. : Township)

BGN GNIS: Milo, Town of
151 ## $a Milo (Me. : Town)

These non-local jurisdictions are called “townships” in Arkansas, California, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and South Dakota; they are called “towns” in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. If there is more than one township with the same name in the same state, apply Policy Statement 16.2.2.12.
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