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Indeed, but as I said, Steve Lasker tuned to musical pitch and it happened to work out that the hum 
also sat at 120-121hz. Furthermore, to pitch it down to where those YouTube clips are, I think 
you're down below 100hz with the hum. I would call that unlikely but not impossible in 1937 Texas.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Parker Dinkins" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, November 01, 2014 8:08 AM
Subject: [ARSCLIST] Robert Johnson Wrong Speed?


> Powerline frequencies in major cities in the US were not synchronized until after World War II. At 
> all. The citation for this statement can be found in the archive. It came from a US military 
> source.
>
> A much more detailed analysis of the vagaries of powerline frequency pre-1965 was made by Mr. 
> Brock-Nannestad on Nov. 3, 2009, with the subject heading "power line frequency".
>
> Hum signatures are a valuable resource for speed correction when they come from a synchronized 
> source, such as the modern power grid.
>
> --
> Parker Dinkins
>
>
>> Date:    Fri, 31 Oct 2014 06:23:03 -0400
>> From:    Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Robert Johnson Wrong Speed?
>>
>> Hi Thomas:
>>
>> The 2011 reissue IS the correct speed, based on the 120hz hum from the original recording 
>> equipment.
>> I was trying to stop this mythology, after talking with Seth. Let me say again -- the 2011 IS the
>> correct speed, unless there was some freak power system present in Texas that operated at some
>> frequency other than 120hz (just about zero chance of that). So, again, what you hear on that 
>> 2011
>> edition IS the correct speed. All other discussion of "theories" of other speeds are not based on
>> facts. To quote Seth Winner again, "the hum doesn't lie."
>>
>> -- Tom Fine
>
>