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You're thinking stereo "1812." It was issued originally as SR90054, then as part of "the Guns LP" 
with "Wellington's Victory" on the other side. "Wellington's" was originally issued with a Beethoven 
overture after the narration. Mono "1812" was actually in print for a relatively short time. It came 
out in 1956 and immediately sold fast, going RIAA Gold ($500,000 sales in those days) very quickly. 
It was replaced by stereo "1812" in 1959, which was purposely put in similar packaging even though 
it was an entirely new recording of everything, including a different cannon and different bells. 
Mono and stereo were sold alongside each other while this sort of thing was done, early in the 
stereo LP era. Then, mono was taken out of print in the early 60s and stereo became the "1812" of 
record. Stereo was certified RIAA Gold several times over by the end of the 60's. The CD reissue 
also went Gold in the 1990s, rare for a classical reissue CD. By the way, the 1990s CD is the first 
time that all elements were first-generation without a tape generation involved in the mix. There 
was a mix done, from the tape masters of the music (first-generation tapes) and from a digital SFX 
track put together from transfers of first-generation weaponry and bells sources, edited in the 
Sonic workstation and played back through a dCS DAC, and mixed with the music tapes live 3-2 to the 
digital mastering system. There's better clarity for everything vs. the LP. All of the mono and 
stereo LP versions of the "1812" originally released in the 50s and 60s were from 2nd generation 
mix-down tapes because that was required in order to mix music and SFX.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Paul Stamler" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2015 8:46 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Distressing data point for upcoming ARSC tape playback workshop


> On 3/1/2015 7:25 PM, Tom Fine wrote:
>> No, that was sides A and B of the same album.
>
> I thought the 1812 was also issued separately, perhaps as part of a "Greatest Hits" compilation. 
> Am I wrong about that?
>
> Peace,
> Paul
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Paul Stamler" <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2015 7:25 PM
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Distressing data point for upcoming ARSC tape
>> playback workshop
>>
>>
>>> On 3/1/2015 3:52 PM, Tom Fine wrote:
>>>> You are asking all good questions! Unfortunately, back in the era of the
>>>> mono "1812" master tapes, Audio Devices put batch numbers only on crates
>>>> containing the individual tape reels. In fact, in that era, they often
>>>> didn't have any Audiotape branding on the brown-cardboard packaging for
>>>> bulk sales to studios and other professional/industrial buyers. The
>>>> pretty boxes were mainly for 7" reels for sale to consumers.
>>>
>>> Here'a a suggestion from left field. The 1812 was an enormously
>>> popular record, the Capriccio less so. Is it possible that the box for
>>> the 1812 was opened and handled more often as new masters were cut?
>>> And could that conceivably have had something to do with the 1812's
>>> greater deterioration?
>>>
>>> Peace,
>>> Paul
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>