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As was found out during the recording of weaponry for Mercury's "1812" Overture releases, both mono 
and stereo, mic placement is critical or you get cancellations from multiple arrival times. For the 
mono "1812" cannon, two mics were tried and found to produce unsatisfactory results. A sweet spot 
for one U-47 mic was found, after a lot of testing. That information proved useful when the stereo 
recording of a different cannon, also fired at West Point, was done a few years later. Bob Eberenz 
told me that it turned out that the center mic was placed about the same distance and height as the 
single mic, and then the sides were spread not too far. It turned out that a tighter stereo pattern 
worked best for maximizing the initial blast, and having three Schoeps M201 mics in omni mode 
captured plenty of air and space and echo tails over the surrounding hillsides. This learning was 
greatly beneficial for recording Civil War weaponry and the more complex weaponry recordings for 
Beethoven's "Wellington's Victory".

Regarding the WWI recordings, "stereo" might not work at all, but multiple source-points will likely 
produce very different perspectives and frequency spectrums.

By the way, speaking of WWI recordings, perhaps the most ghastly is HMV's "Gas Attack" 78. The sound 
isn't as disturbing as what it represents.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Randy A. Riddle" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, March 16, 2015 9:14 AM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] "Sound" of the end of WWI


> It might be worth checking if the Signal Corps still has some of these
> original strips of film or whatever they are.
>
> Since multiple mics were used, you could do a stereo mix!
>
> rand
>
> On Mon, Mar 16, 2015 at 9:10 AM, Patrick Feaster <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> The sound of the end of World War One certainly seems worth trying to play
>> back.  I'll give it a try from the published image (originally the
>> frontispiece of *America's Munitions, 1917-1918, *which we have in the
>> library here at Indiana University) and report back on the results --
>> though I have a feeling that it would take some pretty serious subwoofers
>> to do the sound-ranging records justice.  And no, I had no idea such
>> equipment existed before it came up on ARSCLIST just now.
>>
>>  - Patrick
>>
>> On Sun, Mar 15, 2015 at 2:21 PM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>> > Maybe Patrick Feaster will be able to scan and "play" that film snippet.
>> >
>> > -- Tom Fine
>> >
>> > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Randy A. Riddle" <
>> > [log in to unmask]>
>> > To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2015 9:18 AM
>> > Subject: [ARSCLIST] "Sound" of the end of WWI
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >  This graphic has been making the rounds at several websites and forums
>> >> recently.  It's from the book "America's Munitions 1917-18" by Benedict
>> >> Crowell and apparently shows the sound of the end of WWI:
>> >>
>> >> http://life.time.com/history/world-war-i-ceasefire-
>> >> november-11-1918-graphic/#1
>> >>
>> >> From my limited Googling around, this appears to have been created by a
>> >> military sound ranging system using low frequency microphones that was
>> in
>> >> development during the War.
>> >>
>> >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound_ranging#World_War_I
>> >>
>> >> Are there any more original examples of these recordings that survive in
>> >> their original form and not as reproductions in books?  Patrick Feaster
>> >> know about this?
>> >>
>> >> rand
>> >>
>> >> ______________
>> >> Randy A. Riddle
>> >> www.coolcatdaddy.com
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>>
>
>