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Tom-

Take my word for it, I bemoan the lack of creativity as much as anyone.
But this lawsuit, which as I said is full of inconsistencies and specious reasoning is not the answer to the problem. Unless the actual chords and top line and words are infringing and I frankly do not believe that they are, this suit is not the answer to
our prayers. The number of people doing something challenging and daring is perilously few but misguidedly awarding a lot of money to the Marvin Gaye estate simply will not change that toxic environment as far as I am concerned.

AA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 16, 2015, at 4:48 PM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Hi Aaron:
> 
> What if "all the help it can get" entails a forced burst of originality? Just sayin' ...
> 
> Maybe American popular music has been too derivative and has driven itself into a dark corner where nothing sounds new and thus very little sounds interesting. Laziness and taking the path of least resistance are human nature, so it's not surprising that in an age where nearly every bit of recorded popular music is hearable, most of it instantly, the typical pop artist wouldn't feel the need to sweat hard and find inspiration in a new direction.
> 
> Rather than protecting a bad status quo, shouldn't we embrace mechanisms that will shake out the dead wood and foster new creativity? I think that's the only future for all western musics (all of which, it's arguable, have become very derivative and stale).
> 
> -- Tom Fine
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Aaron Levinson" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Monday, March 16, 2015 3:51 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] maybe the end of ripoff "songwriting"
> 
> 
>> One point is that people are constantly referencing the similarities in the RECORDINGS, which the Gaye estate by the way, does not even own. This ruling will not stand imho.
>> Nor should it.
>> 
>> The chords and melody are quite different and a rhythm itself  cannot be copyrighted. This seems more a case of people not liking Robin Thicke and the court of public opinion and not a musicological debate.
>> 
>> I think if it does stand it will have a decidedly negative and chilling effect on creativity in popular music and that alone is extremely unfortunate.
>> Creativity in popular music in this day and age needs all the help it can get.
>> 
>> Respectfully,
>> 
>> AA
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone