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But overall the cost of media has declined too Tom. That's why I'd be
curious to see if there's been a real decline in physical media units sold
or just less revenue.

On Wed, Apr 15, 2015 at 1:26 PM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> Streaming, particularly YouTube and Spotify plus Apple and Amazon
> recently-launched streaming services are counted in these stats as
> "digital" sales. What is not counted is illegal download sites and other
> stealing, but I wonder exactly how much that amounts to these days. All of
> these streaming services offer all you can hear or just about all you can
> hear with a free subscription (generally ad-supported). So I doubt that too
> many people go to great lengths to steal MP3 downloads anymore.
>
> The bottom line numbers suggest there is a serious decline in music retail
> spending. Some of it has been due to the lower cost per song for streaming
> and some downloads, and some due to theft. But, there's been nearly a 2/3
> decline since 1996 while the population and GDP have risen substantially.
> That simply equates to much less music retail per capita, ie less music
> consumption.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Hugh Paterson III" <
> [log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2015 3:05 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Depressing stats for fans of recorded music and
> fans of physical product
>
>
>
>  Without reading the original article, it seems that they are trying to put
>> a metric on media consumption. In the 1990s/2000s I bought CD
>> subscriptions, now I buy media streaming. So, it is like comparing apples
>> and oranges, because some of the physical distribution before was about
>> supplying the demand for the equivalent of "streaming". I go to YouTube to
>> listen to music, when I want to hear a song I don't currently have on the
>> device I have with me. I don't think society at large has stopped
>> appreciating music, only that what we are paying for is not as trackable
>> (by the same metrics).
>>
>> - Hugh
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Apr 15, 2015 at 10:59 AM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>  Reported in today's Wall Street Journal, with an equally depressing
>>> graphic:
>>>
>>> 1. 1996 global music sales as reported by International Federation of the
>>> Phonographic Industry: $40 billion.
>>>
>>> 2. 2004 global music sales as reported by IFPI: $21 billion.
>>>
>>> 3. 2015 global music sales as reported by IFPI: about $15 billion.
>>>
>>> 3a. World population in 1996 was about 5.8 billion. In 2014, it was 7.2
>>> billion (U.N. figures)
>>>
>>> 3b. 1996-2014, global gross domestic product from about 40 trillion US
>>> dollars to over 100 trillion US dollars (economywatch.com)
>>>
>>> 4. In 2015, for the first time, downloads and streaming sales total was
>>> higher than CDs and other physical media: $6.9b vs. $6.8b. (the remaining
>>> $1.3 billion in sales came from radio airplay and songs licensed for
>>> movies
>>> and video).
>>>
>>> 5. Net-net, phyiscal media is now about 45% of total music sales, and
>>> still losing ground. Streaming/subscription is the growth area. Downloads
>>> are also sliding. The world of artwork, physical product and ownership of
>>> one's purchased music is slipping away. Furthermore, recorded music
>>> appears
>>> to be of declining value to an increasing world population with increased
>>> spending power.
>>>
>>>
>>
>>