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I just say that from the standpoint of the population growing by 1.5 billion since 1996. But I think the digital revolution has on a whole brought more music to more people. That does not however mean they understand it and on that point I sadly agree Tom.

AA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 15, 2015, at 8:02 PM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Hi Aaron:
> 
> Do you have any stats or other concrete evidence of this? I have my doubts. I think music is "background noise" to a growing number of people, something heard in snippets in commercials or behind a shopping cart. I see a lot of people with earbuds in the gym, but when I ask what they're listening to, it's a lot of podcasts and audiobooks, which surprised me. Same on the commuter train. FM radio dial in metro NY offers more talk stations and fewer music stations than when I was a kid, and almost no music on the AM dial anymore. Music is all over YouTube, and we talk about it here, but the most popular stuff for "regular" people who aren't sound-obsessed is either obscene or silly (cat chases dog up tree, etc). With more entertainment options, and attention spans being destroyed by devices, I think the act of sitting still and listening to music is becoming quaint and antiquated for large numbers of people. I'm happy to be a dinosaur, to quote a previous post, but it's good to be a self-aware dinosaur and understand that numbers don't lie.
> 
> To address Randy's question -- the actual numbers of CDs sold has plummetted in this decade. Check Soundscan and RIAA stats. Downloads were picking up the slack (at greatly reduced revenue numbers) for a while, but now they are declining as streaming (which REALLY reduces revenue) has taken hold. I like the convenience of Spotify and YouTube as much as the next guy, but there will come a time where there will be no high-quality new content produced anymore because there will not be adequate revenue streams to produce it. For fans of Amateur Hour in Siberia, this may be great news. For the rest of us, not so much.
> 
> -- Tom Fine
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Aaron Levinson" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2015 4:52 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Depressing stats for fans of recorded music and fans of physical product
> 
> 
>> Not to put too fine a point on it but I think "music consumption" broadly speaking as distinct from income
>> generated has actual risen quite a bit since 1996.
>> 
>> AA
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>>> On Apr 15, 2015, at 4:26 PM, Tom Fine <tflists@BEVERAGE-ke