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Also, I see we have some serious Apple defenders on this list. Not meaning to start a cult-debate 
flame-a-thon, but iTunes for Windows does apparently behave differently than iTunes for Mac. 
Luckily, in the Windows world, we have the no-cost and excellent Foobar2000 to play just about all 
formats, including FLAC and DSD (with added open-source plug-ins).

As for mastering in iTunes, I would be very careful about that and do bit-level comparisons with the 
master files and resulting CD. I suspect iTunes converts to some interim format and then burns the 
CD.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "John Haley" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2015 5:19 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Is it time to rethink FLAC ?


>I can't imagine any audio professional who masters audio in iTunes.  I
> can't get a grip on that as a concept.
>
> Best,
> John Haley
>
>
>
> On Sun, May 17, 2015 at 5:07 PM, David Glasser <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
>> There is a utility program available that allows iTunes to play FLAC
>> files. I don't recall the name. An easy solution is to simply decode your
>> FLAC files and save them as wavs. That's kind of what FLAC was originally
>> designed for - a "zip" file for audio that took up less bandwidth for
>> transfers, but could be decoded to wav or aif.
>>
>> David Glasser
>> Airshow Mastering
>> Boulder, CO
>>
>> Sent from Weathership Tango Delta
>>
>> > On May 17, 2015, at 14:38, Michael Gillman <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >
>> > ALAC is open source abd has been for several years.
>> > Apple doesn't support FLAC due to questions over some of the patants that
>> > might not be Open Source. With deep pockets they would be the perfect
>> > target of a suit. I would love to see Apple support FLAC, maybe after M$
>> > does they may make the move.
>> >
>> > Mike
>> >
>> >
>> >>>
>>
>
>