Print

Print


Hey Dave, lighten up.

I'm not sneering at all. I was asking a question. Agree that Austin High School take on hot jazz was 
not exactly like the original New Orleans style, but neither was the revival. I also disagree with 
your statement about Lu Watters, please provide some evidence. I sense from you a strong west coast 
circa 1952 bias.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Dave Radlauer" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2015 9:36 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Of interest to hot jazz fans


> Tom --
>
> Not for everyone wanted to play bop.  Haven't you heard of the famous war
> in jazz between the moderns and the moldy figs?  Really your statement is
> beneath you.
>
> There were still young urban middle and working class white guys inspired
> by New Orleans music.  In the end, that generation including Lu Watters had
> a larger and still ongoing impact worldwide and culturally than the Condon
> gang, who were playing bastardized New Orleans anyway.
>
> I'm sorry, but sneering at guys playing music they loved is not a pretty
> stance.
>
> Dave
>
>
>
> On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 5:21 PM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
>> Huh? Why a "revival" then, of something that was still being played by the
>> originators?
>>
>> Wasn't bebop that "new generation" music?
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Dave Radlauer" <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Friday, May 22, 2015 7:41 PM
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Of interest to hot jazz fans
>>
>>
>>  Every generation wants its own music, that's why.
>>>
>>> Dave Radlauer
>>>
>>> www.JAZZHOTBigstep.com
>>>
>>>
>>>  Question - if the Austin High School Gang was still putting out records
>>>> through the late 40s and well into the LP era, why was a "hot jazz
>>>> revival"
>>>> necessary or commercially viable?
>>>>
>>>> -- Tom Fine
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>
>
> -- 
> hm# 510-848-8323
> cell# 510-717-5240
> www.JAZZHOTBigstep.com
>
>