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Fascinating tidbit from the article:
"In 2010, the Woody Guthrie Foundation received 18 oversize phonograph disks from an anonymous donor. No one knew if any of the dirt-stained recordings featured Guthrie, but Tiffany Colannino, then the foundation’s archivist, had stored them unplayed until she heard about Irene.

Last fall, the center extracted audio from one of the records, labeled “Jam Session 9” and emailed the digital file to Ms. Colannino.

“I was just sitting in my dining room, and the next thing I know, I’m hearing Woody,” she said. In between solo performances of “Ladies Auxiliary,” “Jesus Christ,” and “Dead or Alive,” Guthrie tells jokes, offers some back story, and makes the audience laugh. “It is quintessential Guthrie,” Ms. Colannino said.”

Are these available to hear on the web?

<L>
Lou Judson
Intuitive Audio
415-883-2689

On May 5, 2015, at 7:56 AM, Julie Martin <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> New York Times - May 4, 2015
> Ghostly Voices from Thomas Edison's Dolls Can Now Be Heard!
> http://nyti.ms/1F2FaY8
> 
> Using the new IRENE technology, NEDCC recently helped recover sound from some of Thomas Edison's early experimental 'Talking Dolls.'
> 
> "In 1890, Edison's dolls were a flop; production lasted only six weeks. Children found them difficult to operate and more scary than cuddly. The recordings inside, which featured snippets of nursery rhymes, wore out quickly. Yet sound historians say the cylinders were the first entertainment records ever made, and the young girls hired to recite the rhymes were the world's first recording artists."   - Ron Cowen, New York Times, May 4, 2015
> 
> LEARN MORE about the Edison National Historic Park: http://bit.ly/EdTalkDolls
> 
> LEARN MORE about the IRENE technology: http://bit.ly/IRAudio
> 
> *******************************************
> NORTHEAST DOCUMENT CONSERVATION CENTER
> www.nedcc.org
>