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I don't understand.  What two grooves are you referring to?

As I think you referred to earlier, there is a lot more groove distortion on lateral cut records than on vertical cut.  This is because on vertical cut records, the geometry of the groove never changes.  Since lateral cut records are cut with a stylus that is far narrower front to back than it is side to side, the groove will be much narrower as the modulation carries it from side to side than it will as the signal brings it around the peaks of the waves.  This is why there is a vertical element on lateral records.  You can't play a record with a cuttng stylus, hence the stylus will always have a different shape from the cutter.  The result is that the playback stylus will be pushed up from the record surface when the groove is narrow and lowered back down when the groove is wide.  But it is important to remember that this does not represent a vertical component that was recorded.  This is one of the many reasons why vertical cut records usually sound so
 much cleaner and the styluses last so much longer.  I have an Edison machine from 1917, 98 years old, and it still has its original stylus and I just had it checked and was told it is like new.

db
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On Wed, 5/6/15, Jamie Howarth <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

 Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Playing Edison Diamond discs
 To: [log in to unmask]
 Date: Wednesday, May 6, 2015, 3:32 PM
 
 Correct, and I'm
 talking about phase because the two grooves are never
 perfectly perpendicular. 
 
 
 
 Please pardon
 the misspellings and occassional insane word substitution
 I'm on an iPhone
 
 >
 On May 6, 2015, at 3:25 PM, DAVID BURNHAM <[log in to unmask]>
 wrote:
 > 
 > Actually,
 Mickey, Pete is correct.  What you are describing is
 polarity reversal, as Michael Biel is usually only to happy
 to discuss.
 > 
 > Dave
 
 >
 --------------------------------------------
 > On Wed, 5/6/15, Mickey Clark <[log in to unmask]>
 wrote:
 > 
 > Subject:
 Re: [ARSCLIST] Playing Edison Diamond discs
 > To: [log in to unmask]
 > Date: Wednesday, May 6, 2015, 1:43 PM
 > 
 > Pete-Phasing is
 inverting the
 > waveform - no delay
 temporally-Mickey
 > Follow me on
 Twitter
 > https://twitter.com/MickeyRClark
 > M.C.Productions Vintage Recordings
 >     710 Westminster Ave.
 West
 >          
 >    Penticton BC
 > 
                V2A
 >
 1K8
 >         
    1-250-462-7881
 > 
    http://mcproductions.ca
 > ----- Original Message ----- 
 > From: "Pete Tinker" <[log in to unmask]>
 > To: <[log in to unmask]>
 > Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2015 8:51 AM
 > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Playing Edison
 Diamond discs
 > 
 > 
 >> Please forgive this uneducated
 question.  Much of
 > the discussion on
 this 
 >> topic has focused on the
 "phase" of different
 >
 transfers.  I'm not a 
 >> signal
 processing guy, but to me "phase" involves the
 > frequency of the 
 >>
 signal, so changing the phase is a temporal shift in
 > the signal (a 
 >>
 lateral shift along the time axis) by a fraction of
 > some wavelength.  At 
 >> times in this discussion, it seems
 that the intention
 > of changing the 
 >> phase is a reversal of the amplitude
 of the digital
 > signal (mirroring it 
 >> across the time axis), for which
 frequency is
 > irrelevant.
 >> 
 >> If I have a
 stereo signal from a hill 'n' dale source,
 > it seems the 
 >>
 preferred next step is to invert the phase of one
 > channel and then 
 >>
 combine (add) the two channels prior to any digital
 > noise reduction.  
 >> What is the meaning of
 "phase" in this context?
 >>
 
 >> -- 
 >> *Pete
 Tinker*
 >> West Hills, CA 91307
 >> 818-three/four/six-5213
 >> 818-six/nine/four-5213 /(cell)/
 > 
 > ---
 > This email has been checked for viruses by
 Avast antivirus
 > software.
 > http://www.avast.com
 >