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Hi Tom

I was actually going to look into that. It's a 3 CD set of orchestral music from Rimsky-Korsakov operas. Even if I'm able to find another copy, I'll still try the hot water process, especially since at that point there's nothing to lose. 

db

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 29, 2015, at 6:44 PM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Hi John:
> 
> Agree with you all the way.
> 
> Question for Dave -- is this CD out of print? It might just be easier to buy a new copy on Amazon or from "new and used" associated sellers. Or borrow it from your library, make a bit-perfect copy, and be done with it.
> 
> -- Tom Fine
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "John Schroth" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 6:02 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Chandos CD ALERT
> 
> 
>> Another great chemical to try is Eucalyptus oil. It is natural and in most cases as good as "goo-gone" without the harsh chemicals. I've been using this for years on other types of media with great success to remove goo, adhesives, even sharpie markings. Easy to get at a health/natural food store and many pharmacies. I don't know what the short-term or long-term effect Eucalyptus oil has on CD plastic is though. I'm presently out - otherwise I'd test it on a CD for you. My gut feeling is that it would not cloud the CD plastic - at least not right away.
>> 
>> As soon as you do find a way to remove the foam/glue, I'd copy or rip the disk to file be safe.
>> 
>> I'd like to add a step 4 - NOTE: The following would be a last resort if the only chemical that removed the foam, also clouded the CD plastic, and you had no other option.
>> 
>> Using a straight edge safety razor blade to remove or "shave" off the foam/goo off the surface of the CD (like using a straight edge razor at an extreme angle to remove your car's inspection sticker). Granted glass is much harder than CD disk plastic. There would likely be resultant surface scratches but these can be removed with a good disk surface re-finisher. Not that it fits in everyone's budget, but our shop is lucky enough to have an RTI disk resurfacing machine and they do a fantastic job on removing even moderate to aggressive scratches and the disk looks and plays like new after. I've refinished disks 4-5 times without getting down to the photo-sensitive dye layer.
>> 
>> Regards
>> 
>> John Schroth
>> MTS
>> 
>>> On 9/29/2015 5:18 PM, Tom Fine wrote:
>>> I would say, hot tap water and don't handle the disc too aggressively because you might well warp it. Boiling water, no, at least not with a disc you care about. Maybe boiling water isn't so hot it would warp or melt the plastic, maybe it is. I wouldn't want to find out it is by boiling a disc I cared about!
>>> 
>>> In thinking about this thread, if I were you I'd try:
>>> 
>>> 1. hot tap water and gentle pressure on the disc surface, supporting the disc on a flat surface if possible
>>> and if that doesn't work ...
>>> 2. isopropynol on something akin to a pelon wipe, appyling as gentle pressure as will remove the goo
>>> and if that doesn't work ...
>>> 3. Naptha, same technique as the isopropynol.
>>> 
>>> Let us know what works, and if isoprop or naptha cloud up the plastic (I don't think they will, but I don't know this for a fact). It would be good to have some actual experience-based knowledge!
>>> 
>>> -- Tom Fine
>>> 
>>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Dave Burnham" <[log in to unmask]>
>>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>>> Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 5:09 PM
>>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Chandos CD ALERT
>>> 
>>> 
>>> How hot are we talking about, hot tap water, tap water too hot to touch, or water heated on a stove? Wouldn't that damage the disc?
>>> 
>>> db
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> 
>>>> On Sep 29, 2015, at 4:44 PM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> Dave Burnham, I think John makes a good suggestion -- try very hot water first, see how you do. And please report back if you try it! I'd like to know if water alone will remove the goo.
>>>> 
>>>> -- Tom Fine
>>>> 
>>>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "John Schroth" <jschrothjr@ROCHESTERRRCOM>
>>>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>>>> Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 4:10 PM
>>>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Chandos CD ALERT
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>>> Interestingly enough - I have a rather large camera collection in my lobby and the leatherette finish on some of the 1970's Kodak Camera products (such as the Super 8mm motion picture cameras) are also turning to goo.
>>>>> 
>>>>> What about using very hot water to soften and remove the foam from between the CD's? In that way one does not stand the risk of clouding the CD surface with a chemical.
>>>>> 
>>>>> John Schroth
>>>>> MTS
>>>>> 
>>>>>> On 9/29/2015 2:03 PM, Tom Fine wrote:
>>>>>> Hi Alan:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Yes, agree. However, let me report that I just salvaged several Kodak slide carousel trays from the 1980s, and the foam was in good shape. I still threw it out, knowing it would eventually go bad.
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> I do think the US and European versions of this foam were different "recipes," and that the US version tends to last longer and deteriorate more as a somewhat sticky powder rather than a ruinous gooey ooze. It probably also depends on climate (temp and humidity).
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> -- Tom Fine
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alan Lewis" <[log in to unmask]>
>>>>>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>>>>>> Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 1:55 PM
>>>>>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Chandos CD ALERT
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> The same foam warning should be applied to many AV products and  containers:
>>>>>>>  -  3M 2" videotape cases from the  1960s used a foam gasket that
>>>>>>> deteriorates.
>>>>>>>  -  Some Kodak 35mm Carousel slide drum  cardboard boxes had a sheet of
>>>>>>> foam in them.
>>>>>>>  -  Some electronic component  packaging and carrying cases were/are
>>>>>>> foam lined.
>>>>>>>  -  Some 3M 1" and 2" videotape reels had a  foam lined upper flange