Print

Print


I have viewed this subject on the ARSCLIST several times over the past
​ ​
several​ years, often with a fair bit of
​flame​
attached​​​, and I think Tom is right.  Someone needs to study the effects
of different cleaning regimens
​scentifically.  Anybody can say their system is the best, but until
someone actually examines the whole groove before and after cleaning, there
is no way of knowing for sure.  How to examine the whole groove before and
after cleaning is a grand question.  Can you do it with an optical device?

>
>
>
> > Date:    Fri, 15 Jan 2016 07:16:30 -0500
> > From:    Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> > Subject: Re: Cleaning stylus
> >
> > Hi Steve:
> >
> > Could you cite the presentation, preferably a link to the conference
> page? I would like to study
> > that presentation, see what their methodology was. LOC has resources
> where we may have the
> > microscope photos and the like. I also hope they addressed the issues of
> every day cleaning of
> > regular records, not just fragile problem cases.
> >
> > -- Tom Fine
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Steve Smolian" <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 9:59 PM
> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Cleaning stylus
> >
> >
> > The results of the Library of Congress' rigorous testing of record
> cleaning products were presented
> > by them at a recent ARSC Conference- last year of that of the previous
> one.
> >
> > Though not named, the product that best the others, and by a
> considerable margin, was Disc Doctor.
> > There are legal reasons such Government testing does not identify
> products going back to NSIT's
> > earlier days.  The presentation was made in such way, however, that it
> was murkily clear that Disc
> > Doctor prevailed, and this was confirmed to me privately elsewhere.
> >
> > Steven Smolian
>


-- 
Frank B Strauss, DMD