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James,
Ironically, in your assesement of the Knowledge graph "what's so amazing?",
you've outlined exactly what is amazing.  We *don't* have to go to many
other resources to find out the details of the singer.  It's gathered for
us in one place because the data is in fact linked together.  I take issue
with Wikipedia being the source, but the way I see it is that it is a
'proof of concept' of how linked data can work for us.

And yes, admittedly out catalog/search systems need work.  So if we are
going to undertake a revolution in how they work, it would be prudent to
see how the underlying data can be altered as well to suit the needs we and
researchers may have.

joy

-joy

On Thu, Feb 25, 2016 at 2:33 AM, James Weinheimer <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On 2/24/2016 9:44 PM, Young,Jeff (OR) wrote:
>
>> Another place we see Google using their Linked Data is in their Knowledge
>> Graph Search API:
>>
>> https://developers.google.com/knowledge-graph/
>>
>> Search results link to a full page description as opposed to the "card"
>> they present in their regular search results. For example:
>>
>> http://g.co/kg/m/0dl567
>>
>> They don't provide access to their underlying graph, but this makes it
>> easier to imagine the possibilities.
>>
>
> So exactly what are the possibilities here that are so amazing? In this
> Knowledge Graph, Google ripped off information from Wikipedia, where we
> learn her age, we get a picture, her height, her parents, her siblings.
> People can easily find this sort of biographical information in a lot of
> places now. We also discover a few of her songs, her profiles, a few of her
> albums, and we also discover that people who searched for her also searched
> for Selena Gomez and Justin Bieber, among others. Big whoop. I am not
> saying this is bad, but what is so amazing about it? It's like looking her
> up in an encyclopedia or even a fanzine.
>
> If we compare this with just a Worldcat search,
> http://www.worldcat.org/search?q=au%3A%22swift+taylor%22&&dblist=638&fq=,
> there is a lot more there *IF* we know how to look at it. We discover what
> she created, and if the facets were more user friendly (I don't know how
> many users understand the facets), we could limit by format, by the people
> she worked with, languages, dates, "content" and "topic" (library science?
> Art and architecture? Really?).
>
> If we compare the Google Knowledge Graph with Worldcat Identities,
> https://www.worldcat.org/identities/lccn-no2007053238/ we get something
> that (at least I think) is potentially the most interesting of all. There
> are "Related identities" but I think the "Associated subjects" found at the
> bottom could potentially be the most useful because people who are
> interested in her might discover new insights into her work. I confess that
> I did. Being in Rome, Italy, I don't know much about her, but some of the
> subjects are interesting. (The links could work *much* better, by the way)
>
> All brought to you by the catalogers of the world!
>
> This is the kind of information that catalogers make that I believe the
> public could learn to appreciate if they could just see and use it. And you
> don't need linked data to any of it--just different views of our own
> records.
>
>
> James Weinheimer [log in to unmask]
> First Thus http://blog.jweinheimer.net
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> The Library Herald http://libnews.jweinheimer.net/
>
> [delay +30 days]
>



-- 
Joy Nelson
Director of Migrations

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