Lots of things keep me up at night pondering.  My role at my company is to consider how libraries can integrate linked data into an ILS.  Is it possible? (of course) But... How are workflows affected?  What work is required to modify the system.  I'm not thinking at all about the process managing or creating linked data....others before me have set the stage and blazed a path there.  I think about how this works in my part of the universe and how that part of the universe fits into the larger one. And how I can convince others this is a viable path. Surely I'm not as advanced in my thinking as others clearly are.  Cest la vie. 

On Thu, Feb 25, 2016 at 4:06 PM, Martynas Jusevičius <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
I'm not really sure what the problem is here. There are multiple platforms for Linked Data management (including one provided by our company). What exactly is keeping you up at night?

Martynas
graphityhq.com

On Thu, 25 Feb 2016 at 19:41, Joy Nelson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Eric,

>>I’m more interested in how to read, write, and maintain bibliographic data in the form of triples.

That is where the fun begins....figuring out the *how*.  It literally keeps me up nights (in a good way) :-D

-joy

On Thu, Feb 25, 2016 at 9:39 AM, Eric Lease Morgan <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
On Feb 22, 2016, at 8:33 AM, James Weinheimer <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I completely agree that the library community doesn't fully grasp the nature of the transition. We are only at the beginning of a "long, strange trip"--and the resources of some libraries (and librarians themselves!) are almost exhausted already… All of this in the pursuit of a highly abstract goal: an interlinked bibliographic graph…

At the risk of splitting hairs, and to my mind, the goal is not to create an interlinked bibliographic graph, but instead to increasingly enable and empower students, scholars, and life-long learners in the acquisition and development of knowledge. Things like RDF are simply one of the more recent means to facilitating this goal. Graphs are not the end but the means. Moreover, considering today’s networked environment, a library’s catalog needs to go beyond the idea of a (mere) inventory list if the library wants to participate in this global environment. Yes, MARC is a part of the problem, but so is the assumed purpose of the library catalog. If all you want is an inventory list, then that can be done using a flat file with columns for authors, titles, dates, publishers, and location information. But the second any type of subject analysis is performed, the library starts down the path of knowledge development and acquisition.

I’m past whether or not to use RDF as a means to make explicit to the network library holdings and collections. I’m also past whether or not to use BIBFRAME as the ontology. I’m more interested in how to read, write, and maintain bibliographic data in the form of triples.


Eric Lease Morgan
Artist- And Librarian-At-Large

 



--
Joy Nelson
Director of Migrations


Support and Consulting for Open Source Software
Office: Fort Worth, TX
Phone/Fax (888)900-8944

What is Koha?




--
Joy Nelson
Director of Migrations

ByWater Solutions
Support and Consulting for Open Source Software
Office: Fort Worth, TX
Phone/Fax (888)900-8944

What is Koha?