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I agree with Amy Turner and Kevin Randall.  Requiring every name in a
bibliographic catalog to be uniquely formulated is overreaching; but
requiring every name in the NAF to represent an identified person is
central to the purpose of an authority file.

Stephen

On Wed, May 18, 2016 at 12:24 PM, Kevin M Randall <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> Ted, are you saying that creating a unique string for an individual entity
> might be "trying to do too much in the NAF"?  If so, I'd say that is the
> opposite direction we've always been trying to move.  Or has it been
> decided that Cutter's object to "show what the library has by a given
> author" doesn't apply anymore?  (Well, according to most of the "discovery"
> interfaces being foisted upon us nowadays, much of Cutter is essentially
> thrown out the window, with serendipity being the primary means of
> discovery...)
>
>
>
> Until we are able to use identifiers (such as authority record IDs,
> whatever) to bring the authority and bibliographic metadata together for
> the user, unique AAPs are absolutely required to meet the user's needs with
> even the most minimal efficiency.
>
>
>
> Kevin M. Randall
>
> Principal Serials Cataloger
>
> Northwestern University Libraries
>
> Northwestern University
>
> www.library.northwestern.edu
>
> [log in to unmask]
>
> 847.491.2939
>
>
>
> Proudly wearing the sensible shoes since 1978!
>
>
>
> *From:* Program for Cooperative Cataloging [mailto:
> [log in to unmask]] *On Behalf Of *Ted P Gemberling
> *Sent:* Wednesday, May 18, 2016 11:54 AM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* [PCCLIST] Tom Watson/Most Useless Name Qualifier
>
>
>
> Ed,
>
> Yes, this epitomizes the problem I brought out with non-date qualifiers
> for current people, impermanence.
>
>
>
> I appreciate the point Paul Burley made about production pressures. I
> think that point is probably an undercurrent of a lot of other objections
> that have been raised to spending too much time trying to get headings
> right. (I am using “right” as meaning not just following the rules, but
> maximally appropriate for identifying the person.) I wonder if this problem
> is also a result of the decision to create all “differentiated” headings.
> As Ben kind of hinted, if Jenny Barrett authored “An exploration and
> critique of the use of mental health information within refugee status
> determination proceedings in the United Kingdom,” her name is already
> effectively “differentiated” by the 245 even if the 100 is only Barrett,
> Jenny. If libraries, especially PCC libraries, didn’t have pressure to
> create controlled access points for all authors, this is a problem we just
> wouldn’t have until some confusion about her identity came up. Then we
> could call her to get her dates or, if she refused them or had already
> passed away, we could add an appropriate qualifying phrase. By that time,
> we might have more evidence about what phrase is appropriate than we have
> now.
>
>
>
> Could we be trying to do too much in the NAF?
>
>
>
> Ted Gemberling
>



-- 
Stephen Hearn, Metadata Strategist
Data Management & Access, University Libraries
University of Minnesota
160 Wilson Library
309 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Ph: 612-625-2328
Fx: 612-625-3428
ORCID:  0000-0002-3590-1242