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Hi Sam -
Musipedia.com brings up a website that wants to sell the domain name.
I think you mean www.musipedia.org
Malcolm

*******

On 6/25/2016 1:14 PM, Sam Brylawski wrote:
> Hi, Steve,
>
> The best known reference book for this work is Barlow and Morgenstern's
> Dictionary of Musical Themes. I'm sure there are a lot of inexpensive
> copies on the market. Classical themes are indexed by note. You look them
> up by first transposing your tune to C.
>
> Easier yet, are search engines for what I think is called the Parsons
> system or contour. There you notate your tune with repeat, up, or down
> (Beethoven's 5th being, RRDURRDURR...) Try it out at musipedia.com. It's
> remarkable how well it works.
>
> Sam
>
> On Sat, Jun 25, 2016 at 6:11 PM, Steven Smolian <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Hi, John,
>>
>> I have a big score collection.  The problem with these tapes is that I
>> have no clue other than aural as to what is on them.
>>
>> Steve
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:
>> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of John Haley
>> Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2016 2:24 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Identifying classcial music by desktop
>>
>> Hi, Steve,
>>
>> Many editions of collected sheet music, like Schirmer editions of say, the
>> Beethoven Sonatas or Chopin Etudes, have a page in the front with the
>> opening lines of music printed.  So you can look at that and quickly
>> identify a piece.  But that presupposes that you have a collection of such
>> sheet music, which is hard to come by these days.
>>
>> Sometimes it helps if you will have a keyboard handy and can identify what
>> key a piece is in, which usually isn't hard.  It might sound like a Chopin
>> Nocturne, for instance, and if you know the key signature, then you have
>> vastly narrowed the possibilities.   Same for a Vivaldi concerto.  I have
>> even listened to the bits available on Amazon (a few seconds of each
>> track) to identify a particular piece, although they seem to be posting
>> less of those these days.
>>
>> It sounds like a tough job, but somebody has to do it, right?
>>
>> Best,
>> John Haley
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Jun 22, 2016 at 1:49 PM, Frank Strauss <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> Hi Steve-In theory Soundhound can recognize humming or singing, so it
>>> should be able to recognize piano. I have used it for several years,
>>> but have not had 100% success with it. It does a fair job of
>>> recognizing commercial recordings, sometimes giving two different
>>> performances when tried two different times.  Almost always gets the
>>> composer and song/work right. It has gotten much better over the
>>> years. I have it on my iPhone-it's free, I think. If you use your cell
>>> phone, figure out where the mike is, and turn that end toward the sound
>> source.
>>>
>>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>>> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
>>>>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Steven Smolian
>>>>> Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 11:37 AM
>>>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>>>> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Identifying classcial music by desktop
>>>>>
>>>>> I have hundreds of tape reels with classical live concerts and no
>>>>> announcements  This includes solo recitals, baroque music by
>>>>> composers whose names probably end in "I" and the like.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> If I can identify the sequence of works, I can often tie them to
>>> printed
>>>>> programs from which the boxes becam separated and by using other
>>>> resources.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Not being a pianist, I don't know the entire Chopin ouvre, Vivaldi
>>>>> from
>>>> end
>>>>> to end and lots more.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Is there a web site I can play my speakers into via a mike and
>>> converter
>>>> to
>>>>> identify lots of classical music?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Steve Smolian
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Frank B Strauss, DMD
>>>