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The file trick of course is only good for one side of the record, since both sides share the same hole. 

db

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> On Jun 8, 2016, at 4:26 PM, Inigo Cubillo <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> For miscentered records, I use two different techniques: fi-l-ing and
> fi-ll-ing.
> One is making out the center hole to a larger size, grinding with a round
> file of a suitable diameter that I keep near at hand for this purpose. I
> file out the hole all around, but insisting towards the ill direction. The
> results are good, and most of the times you don't need to grind out but a
> few millimeters.
> The other method is to sit a purposely made cardboard platter on the tt,
> same thickness as the spindle size, so to get the spindle hidden, and
> readjust the arm for the new height. Then I center the record on top. This
> is a better method, as you don't hurt the record. But I don't like to have
> no spindle at all, so I only use this in some sessions. Hidden spindle is
> ideal for you can center the record freely. But I feel this unsafe; never
> happened to me that a record flies off the TT, but when there's no spindle,
> l cannot get rid of the sensation that it is going to happen at every
> moment!
> A cork platter should be ideal, for it's soft, light... I could not get
> what I wanted, which was a neat cork platter of the desired thickness, so I
> had to content myself with three platters made out of thick corrugated
> cardboard, and piled one on top of the other, and a final 3 mm cork mat on
> top. But it also works fine. Moreover, being three separated platters and
> the cork mat, it allows resizing for different spindle heights, which I've
> known!
> 
> Saludos,
> 
> Inigo