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Thanks for the thoughts Pete, I was mostly concerned that there was some pressing 'Official' reason that subject had been used (though having checked LC's own catalog [which I should've done before] I see that though the heading is on at least one DLC record, it isn't in LC's catalog)

best,

Netanel Ganin
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Metadata Coordinator -- Hebrew Specialty
Brandeis University
(781) 736-4645 / [log in to unmask]

My pronouns are he/him/his


On Tue, Oct 18, 2016 at 12:06 PM, Wilson, Pete <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

I agree that Christopher Robin is not Christopher Milne.

 

My only question is:  do we really need a fictitious character heading for Christopher Robin?  We don’t make one for every fictitious character.  The dubious assertion that certain books were fiction about the real-life Christopher Milne seems to have been thought by at least one cataloger to have been of interest for cataloging purposes, but I’m not sure there’s a call for a heading for Christopher Robin the fictitious character, unless he has been a character in some non-Pooh-related books, or a subject of nonfiction books.  Which may well be.

 

Pete Wilson

Vanderbilt University

 

From: Program for Cooperative Cataloging [mailto:[log in to unmask]GOV] On Behalf Of Netanel Ganin
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2016 8:29 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [PCCLIST] Christopher Robin

 

Greetings PCC, 

 

While cataloging a Winnie-the-Pooh Hebrew translation, I ran into an oddity. I wanted to run it by some wisdom lest I run afoul of an established practice.

 

I note that there are a few records in OCLC for Winnie-the-Pooh related resources which have a subject heading of 

 

600 1 0 Milne, Christopher 1920-1996. Juvenile fiction

 

(Indeed, the OCLC record I was working from had the same heading)

 

It seems to this cataloger that Christopher Robin, though based on the actual son of A.A. Milne, is a distinct person in his own right and his appearances in fiction are not simply fictionalized appearances of Christopher Milne.

 

Compare with

 

Alice (Fictitious character from Carroll) and

 

Hargreaves, Alice Pleasance Liddell, 1852-1934

 

Here the distinction has been drawn between a fictional character which shares a name with, and is based on, an actual person.

----

 

So what say you O Best Beloved, am I justified in creating: 

 

Robin, Christopher (Fictitious character)? (actual AAP may vary)

 

best,


Netanel Ganin

------------------------------------------------------------

Metadata Coordinator -- Hebrew Specialty

Brandeis University

 

My pronouns are he/him/his