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Sorry, I am still confused. What would a correct timeline be? I would think AES Historical Committee would be willing to correct any errors if presented with evidence.

Marcos

Marcos Sueiro Bal
Senior Archivist, New York Public Radio
646 829 4063

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Gary A. Galo
Sent: Sunday, February 12, 2017 2:37 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Alan Dower Blumlein invented the stereo sound - finally awarded Grammy

The person who might know is Mark Obert-Thorn.

Gary


-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Steve Smolian
Sent: Sunday, February 12, 2017 1:48 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Alan Dower Blumlein invented the stereo sound - finally awarded Grammy

Hi, Mike,

Do you know where the Bell Labs ledger books are located?

Steve	

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Michael Biel
Sent: Sunday, February 12, 2017 12:50 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Alan Dower Blumlein invented the stereo sound - finally awarded Grammy

Keller did twin groove stereo in 1927 as listed in the Bell Labs ledger book. Recorded in the Capitol Theater with the mics on the balcony rail
20 feet apart. they were doing twin groove and single groove recording in 1931 and 32  These were purposeful recordings, unlike the twin disc accidental recordings of HMV and Victor.  But Blumlein has a better set of groupies, perhaps borrowing some from the Tesla groupies.

Mike Biel  [log in to unmask]  

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Alan Dower Blumlein invented the stereo sound - finally awarded Grammy
From: BURNHAM <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Fri, February 10, 2017 8:45 pm
To: [log in to unmask]

It is curious that even though a stereo record groove contains both the left and right signals, (at +/- 45 degrees from perpendicular), and the sum and difference components, (lateral and vertical respectively), Blumlein directed that a stereo cutter should be designed to be fed from the L/R signals, not the M/S signals; curious because all the cutters then in use were designed to cut a lateral signal and so a minor modification of the existing cutter head could have added the vertical difference element. This has always been a mystery to me, but writing about it now, I wonder if it was because he foresaw the use of spaced mikes which don't produce a good mono signal and hence information would be lost to the sum channel. 

db

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 10, 2017, at 5:57 PM, Gary A. Galo <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> I believe the original question was not whether Blumlein invented stereo, but whether he invented 45/45 disc cutting. Related to that, did he invent the pure coincident stereo microphone technique using a pair of crossed figure-8s. I believe the answer to both is yes. But, if Jones invented either of these, specifically, I'd be interested to know.
> 
> Gary
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List 
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of George Brock-Nannestad
> Sent: Friday, February 10, 2017 5:08 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Alan Dower Blumlein invented the stereo sound
> - finally awarded Grammy
> 
> From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
> 
> 
> Hello,
> 
> I rarely post these days, but seeing history distorted again, again, again provokes me.
> 
> It is incredible that even with so many facts now available online people still do not get the stereodisc story right. And, concerning stereo sound to movies, the same errors apply.
> 
> The earliest patented solution of stereo sound on film was by W. 
> Bartlett Jones of Chicago, whose USP 1,944,182 was filed 18 November
> 1930 and patented 23 Jan
> 1934
> 
> He was the pioneer in stereophony, years ahead of Blumlein, Maxfield, Harrison, and Keller.
> 
> Jones' first work in stereophony was put officially to paper in 1927 and published in several other patents. It is difficult to see that Western Electric could have avoided taking licenses if they wanted to commercialise Maxfield's or Keller's contributions. We have not heard about that.
> 
> Keller and Rafuse USP2, 114,471 filed their application on the individual recording of each groove flank on 20 June 1936.
> 
> The whole business of examining the various patent applications has been a shambles, and nobody has investigated them properly. W. Bartlett Jones has only ever been mentioned by me, but I am not going to finish the job.
> 
> Getting killed in the war during important defense work is obviously a much better selling point!
> 
> Best wishes,
> 
> 
> George
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> About time! But I thought Blumlein invented the 45/45 method (later 
>> claimed by RCA<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxelxqtkkdc>), not stereo recording:
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> http://www.aes.org/aeshc/docs/recording.technology.history/stereo.htm
>> l
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> M
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Marcos Sueiro Bal
>> 
>> Senior Archivist, New York Public Radio
>> 
>> 646 829 4063
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List 
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of CJB
>> Sent: Friday, February 10, 2017 7:53 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Alan Dower Blumlein invented the stereo sound - 
>> finally awarded Grammy
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Grammy for a British genius: Inventor of stereo sound that changed 
>> music and film forever is honoured 75 YEARS after he was killed 
>> working on top-secret WWII radar
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4209900/A-Grammy-British-geni
>> u
>> s-change
>> d-music-ever.html
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> CJB.