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yes. I don't know when the law changed but one can create a new copyright
for anything which has been enhanced and republished. Lots of publishers
are now doing that with public domain items.
also if you can enhance a work/book for the handicapped you can publish and
sell it without permission of the copyright owner.



Paul T. Jackson
Trescott Research
Steilacoom, WA 98338
[log in to unmask]
trescottresearch.com

On Apr 25, 2017 9:26 AM, "Lou Judson" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Interesting. I can imagine them being careful about it, but at the studio
> where I do this occasionally, we are considered “work for hire” and the
> client owns the material. We never put our name on it in such cases.
>
> If someone brings in something they do not own, WE insist that they take
> formal responsibility so the studio is not liable for infringement claims…
>
> Turnabout is fair play, maybe?
> <L>
> Lou Judson
> Intuitive Audio
> 415-883-2689
>
> On Apr 25, 2017, at 8:46 AM, Louis Hone <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > I just finished audio restoration for a client who recorded an LP 60
> years
> > ago. He owns the original copyright and all the rights (including
> > publishing) associated with this LP. I digitized the vinyl, did the
> > appropriate cleaning up with RX5, and a bit of mastering to top it off.
> > Sounds good, everybody is happy.
> >
> > However at the end of the project, the client was adamant that I sign
> him a
> > "release" stating that I was not the owner of this new digitized version
> of
> > his LP. He had read somewhere that if a recording that is out of
> copyright,
> > is digitized and cleaned up and rereleased, then the person or company
> > doing this restoration is now the owner of the copyright.
> >
> > I have been doing audio restoration for 20 years now and that is a first
> > for me. Yes I did sign the release (otherwise he wasn't paying me).
> >
> > Anyone else have that situation ?
> >
> > Thanks
> >
> > Louis
> >
>