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It's also worth noting the AAT contains a lot of functions and occupations
relevant to EAD/EAC-CPF descriptions.

Ethan

On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 10:45 AM, L. Rebecca Johnson Melvin <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> Interesting to climb the AAT tree back up to "associated concepts facet" -
> take a look.
>
> We don't often remember that literary genres (bodice-rippers) can be found
> in AAT.
>
> re archivists and MARC: working in an academic setting, I can argue that
> we have always paid attention to the ideal of integration of archival
> holdings into our online catalog with attention to MARC output from EAD
> records.  enormously helpful!
>
>
>
> L. Rebecca Johnson Melvin
> Librarian and Curator, Joseph R. Biden, Jr., Senatorial Papers
> University of Delaware Library
> 181 South College Avenue
> Newark, DE  19717-5267
> 302.831.6089 <(302)%20831-6089> / 302.831.1046 <(302)%20831-1046> (fax)
> [log in to unmask]
>
> On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 10:28 AM, Jane Stevenson <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> Possibly a can of worms I’ve opened up here, but its really useful to get
>> some feedback to help me with advising archivists what to put into this
>> field. I usually have to stand at the front and sound like I know what I’m
>> talking about when I advise on cataloguing…..
>>
>> > I think Jane's statement is about the conflation of genre and format.
>>
>>
>> Yes, I wanted to understand a bit more about why that is the case.
>>
>> > My understanding has always been that the <genreform> element in EAD
>> was intended to correspond to the 655 field in MARC. If you read the 655
>> field definition at http://loc.gov/marc/bibliographic/bd655.html, you'll
>> notice the language describing <genreform> is very similar.
>>
>> I should have thought of looking at MARC - I don’t ever use it myself - I
>> think there is more importance placed on the cross walk from MARC to EAD in
>> the US than in the UK? Here archivists rarely refer to MARC. So, that’s
>> useful as something I can reference.
>>
>>
>> > Controlled vocabularies combine genre and form because there is no
>> clear-cut way to differentiate these and there is very little point in
>> arguing about which list a term should be in.
>>
>>
>> I think that may be another argument, along with basing this on MARC. But
>> it does feel a little wrong to combine ‘diaries, romance, account books,
>> comedy’ (OK, I’ve gone for an extreme example).
>>
>> > A memoir can be published in a diary, or a monograph, online as a blog,
>> or as a docudrama on television. Disambiguating between genre and format
>> (if by format we mean physical or electronic medium) is difficult, but is
>> done routinely within the museum realm.
>>
>>
>> Yes - I guess my feeling is that at times it seems important to
>> distinguish them…but then I come back to the fact that it can all get a bit
>> tricky….
>>
>> > diaries are only form/physical characterics?! So, my *memoir* can be a
>> genre, but my *diary* can only be a form? Surely you want memoirs and
>> diaries to be on the same list of options.
>>
>>
>> Ha. Yes. I thought of diaries as one example where I get confused.  Is a
>> diary a form? Surely the form would be how it was physically represented?
>> Shouldn’t a diary be a ‘style’, which is really a genre?
>>
>> I’m not sure I’m closer to clarity, but its helpful to have a discussion!
>>
>> cheers,
>> Jane
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > On 26 Apr 2017, at 15:10, Bowers, Kate A. <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>> >
>> > Wait--so you are definitely telling me "diaries" are not a genre of
>> writing?  In AAT diaries are in the physical object facet.  Now, about that
>> diary I kept on my PDA and now I keep in the cloud...
>> >
>> > Kate Bowers
>> > Collections Services Archivist for Metadata, Systems, and Standards
>> > Harvard University Archives
>> > [log in to unmask]
>> > 617.496.2713
>> > voice: (617) 998-5238
>> > fax: (617) 495-8011
>> > web: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hul.eresource:archives
>> > Twitter: @k8_bowers
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > From: Encoded Archival Description List <[log in to unmask]> on
>> behalf of Ethan Gruber <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 10:01 AM
>> > To: [log in to unmask]
>> > Subject: Re: [EAD] Genre and Form
>> >
>> > A memoir can be published in a diary, or a monograph, online as a blog,
>> or as a docudrama on television. Disambiguating between genre and format
>> (if by format we mean physical or electronic medium) is difficult, but is
>> done routinely within the museum realm. Fortunately, the Getty AAT has
>> organized their vocabulary in a way that allows us to disambiguate genre
>> and format.
>> >
>> > Ruth, EAD 2002 doesn't have @localtype, but it does have @type, which
>> is functionally equivalent.
>> >
>> > Ethan
>> >
>> > On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 9:52 AM, Bowers, Kate A. <
>> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> > Controlled vocabularies combine genre and form because there is no
>> clear-cut way to differentiate these and there is very little point in
>> arguing about which list a term should be in.
>> >
>> > Quoting from the MARC format 655, which covers genre, form, and
>> physical characteristics
>> > "Examples of genre terms for textual materials are: biographies,
>> catechisms, essays, hymns, or reviews. Examples of form and physical
>> characteristic terms are: daybooks, diaries, directories, journals,
>> memoranda, questionnaires, syllabi, or time sheets. "
>> >
>> > Well, that's nice--diaries are only form/physical characterics?! So, my
>> *memoir* can be a genre, but my *diary* can only be a form? Surely you want
>> memoirs and diaries to be on the same list of options.
>> >
>> >
>> > Kate Bowers
>> > Collections Services Archivist for Metadata, Systems, and Standards
>> > Harvard University Archives
>> > [log in to unmask]
>> > 617.496.2713
>> > voice: (617) 998-5238
>> > fax: (617) 495-8011
>> > web: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hul.eresource:archives
>> > Twitter: @k8_bowers
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > From: Encoded Archival Description List <[log in to unmask]> on
>> behalf of Jane Stevenson <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 4:29 AM
>> > To: [log in to unmask]
>> > Subject: [EAD] Genre and Form
>> >
>> > HI there,
>> >
>> > i’ve never been quite clear about the <genreform> tag.
>> >
>> >
>> > The EAD2002 and EAD3 guide says:
>> >
>> > "A term that identifies the types of material being described, by
>> naming the style or technique of their intellectual content (genre); order
>> of information or object function (form); and physical characteristics.
>> Examples include: account books, architectural drawings, portraits, short
>> stories, sound recordings, and videotapes.”
>> >
>> > But genre is a style, like ‘gothic’ architecture or ‘romantic’
>> literature or ‘garage’ music. So, you might say the ‘form’ is a short story
>> or a videotape, but the genre is ‘comedy’ or ‘documentary’.
>> >
>> > It just doesn’t seem like these are the same thing and I’ve never
>> understood why they are put together.
>> >
>> > I just wondered if anyone has any thoughts on this. I’ve just never
>> been able to convey it to our contributors in a way that makes sense to me
>> because describing something as a ’short story’ seems very different from
>> describing its style as, say, ‘romantic’ in terms of genre. I’ve never
>> understood why we put these together.
>> >
>> > cheers,
>> > Jane
>> >
>> > Jane Stevenson
>> > Archives Hub Service Manager
>> > [log in to unmask]
>> >
>> > Jisc is a registered charity (number 1149740) and a company limited by
>> guarantee which is registered in England under Company No. 5747339, VAT No.
>> GB 197 0632 86. Jisc’s registered office is: One Castlepark, Tower Hill,
>> Bristol, BS2 0JA. T 0203 697 5800.
>> >
>> > Jisc Services Limited is a wholly owned Jisc subsidiary and a company
>> limited by guarantee which is registered in England under company number
>> 2881024, VAT number GB 197 0632 86. The registered office is: One Castle
>> Park, Tower Hill, Bristol BS2 0JA. T 0203 697 5800.
>>
>
>