Print

Print


Sure sounds like an alarm clock to me.  Note that the pitch drops a
little.  Something to restore!

Best,
John Haley


On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 12:49 PM, Marcos Sueiro Bal <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> This is from a 1968 International Interview recording. It comes after a
> 1kHz tone and seems like some kind of alarm, but it is reportedly not part
> of any Emergency Broadcast System nor CONELRAD. It is unknown whether this
> sound was actually broadcast.
>
> http://nyprarchives.tumblr.com/post/161747409571/now-
> what-the-heck-is-this-sound-at-the-start-of-an
>
> Thanks for any help!
>
> Marcos Sueiro Bal
> Senior Archivist, New York Public Radio
> 646 829 4063
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:
> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Paul Jackson
> Sent: Monday, June 12, 2017 2:16 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] CTEA 2018: it's coming
>
> 2018 is when many works of 1923 will become public domain as there are no
> additional extensions available.
>
> A work that was first copyrighted on April 10, 1923, and renewed between
> April 10, 1950, and April 10, 1951, would formerly have fallen into the
> public domain after April 10, 1979. The current law extends this copyright
> through the end of 2018. These second-term copyrights cannot be renewed
> again. Under the law, their extension to the maximum 95-year term is
> automatic and requires no action in the Copyright Office.
>
> On 6/12/2017 8:52 AM, Eli Bildirici wrote:
> > Apropos of some of the conversations being had here about copyright
> > issues surrounding recordings: next year will mark twenty years since
> the last Copyright Term Extension Act. As you all know, the copyright term
> situation is already comically bad, but there is no reason to believe
> Congress won't vote to make it even worse next year, particularly having
> the absolute gift that is this dysfunctional clownshow of a presidential
> administration to distract everyone - to say nothing of the rest of their
> own regressive agenda. (Not that this isn't a bipartisan policy...) Given
> that, seems to me that organizing against this needs to be happening now.
> Typing 'Copyright Term Extension Act' into Google already yields an
> autocomplete of 'of 2018', and ludicrously enough, among the top hits for
> such is a legal article arguing for such an extension. The archivist
> community in particular, I think, understands the chilling effect this has
> on the preservation of cultural treasures (beyond, say, making a personal
> copy and then waiting for Godot, lest you be sued into oblivion by some
> rights troll). Defeating this bill would amount to preserving the status
> quo: already not great, but at least it would begin allowing some works -
> not music, given the even more opaque state copyright regime it lives
> under; not for another fifty years - but at least it would begin allowing
> some works published 1923 and on to pass into the public domain in the next
> few years, instead of delaying that eventuality yet another twenty years.
> > I'm not sure what chance we'd have...but we should at least try, right?
> >
> > Eli Bildirici
> > (347) 837-8337
> >
> > ---
> > This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> > http://www.avg.com
> >
>