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Point of clarification about the Ampex magnetic disc recorder / players.  I
believe they were called Q-Mat, and were intended to compete with broadcast
cart machines.
They played a magnetic floppy disc (before the computer era!)  The discs
were about 11 inches in diameter if memory serves, with a notch that served
to cue it to the start point.  They held several minutes of audio, but only
one "cut" per disc.  We had one record and one playback deck in our
recording studio.  They were extremely heavy, with a very large
footprint...I worried they would collapse the studio cabinetry.  

Best,

Lou Houck
Rollin' Recording
Boerne, TX

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Gary A. Galo
Sent: Sunday, September 03, 2017 10:21 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Major tape recorder brands

Roberts made consumer machines, as I recall, not professional. Crown made
professional recorders, and was still using pressure pads in the 1970s, if
my memory is correct. Mark is right - they were extremely well built. 

Gary

____________________________

Gary Galo
Audio Engineer Emeritus
The Crane School of Music
SUNY at Potsdam, NY 13676

"Great art presupposes the alert mind of the educated listener."
Arnold Schoenberg

"A true artist doesn't want to be admired, he wants to be believed."
Igor Markevitch


-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Hood, Mark
Sent: Sunday, September 03, 2017 11:12 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Major tape recorder brands

I havenıt seen any mention of the Crown tape recorders - they were built
like tanks.  Or how about the Roberts with the ³cross-field² heads?

On 9/3/17, 11:08 AM, "Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List on
behalf of Dennis Rooney" <[log in to unmask] on behalf of
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>Having used two PR-10s in the late sixties, I heartily agree with Lou 
>Judson's condemnation of it, electronics or no. The failure rate of 
>those units matched their poor performance. The model and the almost 
>coeval U-Matic mag disc machine were significant players in fatally 
>damaging Amex's reputation as professional gear. They were, frankly, 
>regarded as a joke.
>
>All Ampex electronics required some modification;  An engineer I worked 
>with built his own for use in an AG-440. Many famous recordings were 
>made with the Ampex 300-2 but no nostalgia for the gear of that 
>vintage, please.
>
>DDR
>
>On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 8:29 PM, Gary A. Galo <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> As I said, a problematic transport. Were it not for the fact that 
>>David  Hancock found the electronics worthy of his own custom tape 
>>recorder, I  would not have mentioned it. True, he modified the 
>>electronics, but David  rarely used anything in stock form.
>>
>> Gary
>>
>> ____________________________
>>
>> Gary Galo
>> Audio Engineer Emeritus
>> The Crane School of Music
>> SUNY at Potsdam, NY 13676
>>
>> "Great art presupposes the alert mind of the educated listener."
>> Arnold Schoenberg
>>
>> "A true artist doesn't want to be admired, he wants to be believed."
>> Igor Markevitch
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:
>> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Lou Judson
>> Sent: Saturday, September 02, 2017 7:57 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Major tape recorder brands
>>
>> Whoo, sorry, but not found in respectable studio! Wow and flutter, 
>>one  motor bely drive, not a studio machine. We had two in a TV studio 
>>in 1969,  and they were barely serviceable. In a voiceover studio, we 
>>could only use  it for voice, not music. Not the top of the line, even 
>>worse than the Ampxs  600.
>>
>> The electronics are minor compared to the cr*ppy transport.
>>
>> Keep this in mind if you mention it in whatever you are writing. And 
>>I'm  mildly surprised you need to research this on THIS list! There is 
>>a whole  internet out there, you know...
>>
>> <L>
>> Lou Judson
>> Intuitive Audio
>> 415-883-2689
>>
>> On Sep 2, 2017, at 4:38 PM, Gary A. Galo <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> > There was also the Ampex PR-10:
>> >
>> > http://www.historyofrecording.com/AMPEX_PR-10.html
>> >
>> > I understand that it had a problematic transport, but excellent
>> electronics, with a simpler signal path than the 300 and 350. David 
>>Hancock  used modified PR-10 electronics with a 350-2 transport to 
>>make his custom,  14-inch machine. The myriad recording he made with 
>>this machine include the  famous Rachmaninoff Symphonic Dances with 
>>Donald Johanos and the Dallas  Symphony for Vox/Turnabout.
>> >
>> > Best,
>> > Gary
>> >
>> > ____________________________
>> >
>> > Gary Galo
>> > Audio Engineer Emeritus
>>
>
>
>
>--
>1006 Langer Way
>Delray Beach, FL 33483
>561.265.2976


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