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"Please keep us posted. If the details are too boring for the list,
please contact me directly via my website" - not boring but highly
relevant to my own project. And I have some of those red cassettes in
the pipeline!!! Chris B.

On 07/04/2018, Corey Bailey <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Hi Eero,
>
> Your research is interesting. The one comment I can make is that you
> need to allow more time for both the low temp. & and the desiccant
> processes. You didn't say just how you protected the cassette while
> freezing but, if you were able to play it the next day, you must have
> done it right. The earliest research on Binder Hydrolysis indicated that
> reducing the temperature and humidity to about 18 Degrees Celsius and
> about 24% Relative Humidity for, at least, 3 Months will actually
> reverse the problem. No mention was made about long term stability so I
> would have to assume that problem tapes would need to be stored in those
> conditions. I would think that the desiccant process would need a
> similar amount of time to be 100% effective if 100% effectiveness is
> achievable using thedesiccant processes. However you are on the right
> track and some experimenting with the time it takes to make the cassette
> playable would would be most interesting. Please keep us posted. If the
> details are too boring for the list, please contact me directly via my
> website
>
> Cheers!
>
> Corey
>
> Corey Bailey Audio Engineering
> www.baileyzone.net
>
> On 4/7/2018 9:46 AM, Eero Aro wrote:
>> Hi All
>>
>> The red labeled BASF LH Super Compact Cassette tape is suffering from the
>> soft binder syndrome. Yellow, orange and green labeled LH Super cassettes
>> don't seem to have the same problem, so they must contain other type
>> of tape.
>> I have been experimenting with the red labeled LH Super cassettes.
>>
>> The cassettes start squealing in the deck after less than a minute's
>> playback. They
>> squeal equally in single and double capstan decks. Cleaning the heads
>> and the tape
>> path helps for another minute of playback or so. The squealing causes
>> modulation and
>> disturbing sounds in the audio output. The tape needs dehydration.
>> However, I don't
>> happen to have a tape baking dehydrator at the moment.
>>
>> I first tried freezing a cassette in the deep-freezer in - 18 degrees
>> overnight.
>> In the morning the tape played without squealing for about five
>> minutes. Better
>> than the less than a minute without any operations.
>>
>> I have seen suggestions that the complete deck should be put in the
>> fridge as well,
>> but I wouldn't like to do that.
>>
>> I decided to try silica gel bags. I did two different versions. In the
>> first I put a cassette
>> into a small plastic box and padded it in between silica gel bags. In
>> the other, I removed
>> the tape from the cassette shell and put just the tape in between the
>> silica gel bags.
>>
>> As untreated, the non-squealing playback time of these two cassettes
>> was about two
>> minutes.
>>
>> The complete cassette that had been in the silica treatment played for
>> about five
>> minutes without squealing.
>>
>> The tape that had been removed from it's shell played for 12 minutes
>> after one night
>> between the silica gels. After four nights silica treatment the tape
>> played for 35
>> minutes without squealing.
>>
>> Before each playback attempt I had cleaned the heads. The deck wasn't
>> powered
>> before the test to prevent it from warming up.
>>
>> I think that this may work so well because it's still winter in
>> Finland and the relative
>> humidity is low. It's about 54% outside right now. As we have the
>> central heating on,
>> it is even drier indoors.
>>
>> Fortunately, my test cassettes don't have any valuable audio content.
>>
>> Eero Aro
>>
>> -----------------------------------------
>> https://www.tonfiks.fi/english
>