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There was a CD reissue of the 1910 Odeon recording by the Japanese Wing label, WCD 62, which I got years ago from HMV Japan. Copyright on the CD is 2001. In his booklet notes, Christopher N. Nozawa notes the odd billing of the orchestra, which translates as the Large Odeon String Orchestra (winds and percussion are clearly audible on the recording). The booklet also cites Hansfried Sieben's Odeon Matrix number catalogs as listing the conductor as Friedrich Kark, noting that he was the house conductor of the Lindstroem Company from 1906 to 1918, and that he conducted most of the early recordings for Odeon/Parlophone, both under his own name and as Friedrich Dannenberg. 

Gary

____________________________

Gary Galo
Audio Engineer Emeritus
The Crane School of Music
SUNY at Potsdam, NY 13676

"Great art presupposes the alert mind of the educated listener."
Arnold Schoenberg

"A true artist doesn't want to be admired, he wants to be believed."
Igor Markevitch


-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Karl Miller
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 3:06 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] First recording of Beethoven's Nine, under one conductor?

Again...according to Arnold there was a Beethoven 5th recorded in 1910 by the Grosses Odeon-Streichorchester. On my copy of the book I penciled in Friedrich Kark as the conductor. That recording is available on Youtube. Beethoven Symphony n.5 - Friedrich Kark - Odeon Symphony Orchestra, Berlin 1910
  
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Beethoven Symphony n.5 - Friedrich Kark - Odeon Symphony Orchestra, Berlin ...
 This is the first recording of this Symphony! (the famous Nikisch recording was in 1913)  |   |

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Karl 

    On Tuesday, April 24, 2018 5:26 AM, Steve Smolian <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
 

 There is at least one from 1911, prob cond. By Otto Urack on Odeon that came before the Nikisch.  There was an Odeon Pastorale credited to Urack, also in 1911.  This according to Arnold.  I have a cassette of the Pastorale somewhere, but can't find it right now.  

Steve Smolian

Steve Smolian

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Jacobus van Dijk
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 3:09 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] First recording of Beethoven's Nine, under one conductor?

The earliest recording of a complete symphony was of course that of Beethoven’s Fifth with the Berlin Philharmonic conducted by Arthur Nikisch and recorded on 11 November 1913. It was reissued on LP on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of The Gramophone Company in 1973 (EMI 1C 053-01 466) and has been reissued on CD several times. It is now available on YouTube etc.

Jacobus van Dijk


> On Apr 24, 2018, at 05:50, Clark Johnsen <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Dear Karl,
> 
> Yes, and I for one would love to hear it. Youtube? Where?
> 
> But my question concerned "Beethoven's Nine". not Ninth. Aha!
> 
> On Mon, Apr 23, 2018 at 8:45 PM, Karl Miller <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> 
>> According to the Arnold discography "The Orchestra on Record," the 
>> first recording of the Beethoven 9th was done in 1923 by the Neues 
>> Symphonie-Orchester conducted by  Bruno Siedler-Winkler, released on 
>> Polydor 69607-69613.
>> 
>> Karl
>> 
>> On Mon, Apr 23, 2018 at 5:07 PM, Clark Johnsen 
>> <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>> 
>>> As a companion to Frank Forman's fascinating question.
>>> 
>>> NB The answer I propose has an asterisk on one of the symphonies.
>>> 
>>