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What you might try
 bury a 30kHz low level sine in it before you make the Melodyne adjustments... that will yield a stepped frequency file that with some smoothing could be a tracking signal... Or at least aid with your arithemetic. 

> On Oct 30, 2018, at 11:21 PM, Steve Smolian <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> I had it years ago.  It worked ok on piano but otherwise tended to rewrite the soundfile rather than adjust it.
> 
> I've just bought their Melodyne 4 essential, $ 100 boxed, $ 50 downloaded.  I installed it tonight and left work as it was loading a soundfile for me to test.  I looked at the videos and suspect that I can get what I want from it.  
> 
> I'm working with a group of acoustical 78s, mono, of course, which seem irregularly pitched from one side to the next and sometimes within the side.  From Melodyne's description and my preliminary look, it may well allow me to make corrections my way- establishing the pitch of an early  sustained non-vocal note by cents, allowing me to move it to A at 440, reading a similar note at the side's end, and, if necessary, others along the way, and, should it differ more than a few cents from that at the start,  resetting pitch by cents as the side progresses through the program.  
> 
> I found a chart on line that gives the pitch in cents for the 12 note scale, note by note, for the entire rage of the piano.  Once I can establishes a pitch on the record and compare it with that that it should be, according to the chart, arithmetic becomes my friend.  When a solid 440-based pitch is established for the soundfile throughout, moving it by half-steps will disclose, to the trained but perfect-pitch challenged ear, the proper speed, especially if it is informed by a knowledge of the history of the period of recording of the company that made the master.  I know about other tunings, other cultures and all that, but this is a reasonable and inexpensive way to address this issue.
> 
> It seems to me that this could be created as a plug-in dedicated to this one task.
> 
> Steve Smolian  
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Jamie Howarth
> Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2018 9:15 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Pitch plug-in
> 
> Be careful with Capstan. If there’s much vibrato in the original it will dry it up. Also insists on latching the music to a Western chromatic scale. And the algorithm is cranky sounding. 
> 
> It superficially sounds ok at first blush but if you have a clean original to compare the results with you’ll hear it instantly. And watching what it thinks it should do to a an all digital source with zero wow is pretty alarming. It’s a great jitter-making plug-in. 
> 
> If all you need to correct is a pitch drift Capstan is hitting it with a hammer. 
> 
> If I can help let me know, there’s some clean ways to do this. 
> 
> Please pardon the mispellings and occassional insane word substitution I'm on an iPhone
> 
>> On Oct 24, 2018, at 20:39, Ellis Burman <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> Capstan is perfect for that, though quite expensive, though you can 
>> also rent it for much less.
>> 
>> You can also use a pitch plug-in, even the one that comes with 
>> ProTools, and adjust the fine pitch graph in the automation lane in ProTools.
>> 
>> Ellis
>> 
>>> On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 11:00 AM, Steven Smolian <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>> I'm looking for a pitch bending plug-in where I can adjust places on the
>>> duration line by cents, not semi-tones.   I use a PC and want it to work at
>>> 96/24.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> I'm working with 78s and need to adjust pitch drift.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Steve Smolian
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> --
>> Ellis
>> [log in to unmask]
>> 818-846-5525