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It has been possible for some time to make a very compact machine of 
professional performance - the Lyrec "Freda", not to be confused with 
the "Fred" editor, was such a device, with a small footprint, about 4" 
thick, and taking NAB reels. This did use disc motors, as I recall. 
However, it was a machine designed as a professional tool, rather than 
whatever this Thorens thing is intended to be - it reminds me of a 
Gaumont-British transport ca 1953...

On 13/04/2019 04:45, Tim Gillett wrote:
> The advert speaks of "disc" motors. I'm no expert but I think they 
> mean printed circuit motors which are quite thin from front to back.  
> Neodymium magnets  allow for smaller sized motors for the same power 
> these days. The Thorens advert speaks of an external power supply 
> which of course saves space in the case, and then of course today's 
> electronics can be made much smaller than previously.
>
> An early "compact" reel to reel machine which could handle 10.5" reels 
> was the  Revox A77. I suspect with modern motors and electronics it 
> could be made even thinner and lighter but of course the size of the 
> 10.5" reels limits the minimum dimensions of the front panel.
>
> As an old timer,  when I have to move my machines or service other 
> peoples' there are times when I'd love to work with smaller, lighter 
> machines!
>
> Tim.
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Breneman" 
> <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Saturday, April 13, 2019 1:11 AM
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] AW: [ARSCLIST] Thorens TM 1600 ¼" Tape Machine 
> Announced
>
>
> The machine in the picture is no "thicker" than the turntable.
> What kind of motors would fit in such a small case?  I'm not
> aware of a recent revolution in motor design.  Surely they
> aren't using turntable motors.  Or maybe...
>
> -- 
> David Breneman
> [log in to unmask]
> 
>
> ---
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