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From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad


Hello,

I have never understood why the bit of shaft that pulls the tape along at a hopefully constant peripheral speed is called a 'capstan' -- it does not display any of the functions of a capstan, as it has been understood as a nautical term for centuries. A capstan is a mechanical power amplifying device: a drum with a waist around which a rope (frequently something having a heavier gauge) is wound at least 1½ times. The waist is there to prevent the rope from sliding off the drum. The drum is rotated at some undefined speed with a high torque, and the rope creates a friction against the drum that increases if you pull the loose end of the rope. The friction makes the drum take the work, and the pull on the rope end is the controlling smaller power. It is a power amplifier! A better term in tape recorder connection might be "timing shaft". It is obvious that my complaint belongs to the 1950s, when there might have been a chance to correct the terminology. I just wanted this observation to be on record, and I do not expect any comments -- indeed you would be wasting your time.

Best wishes,


George

----- Original meddelelse -----
Fra: "Aaron Coe" <[log in to unmask]>
Til: "Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List" <[log in to unmask]>
Sendt: fredag, 12. april 2019 19:27:45
Emne: Re: [ARSCLIST] Thorens TM 1600 ¼" Tape Machine Announced

> The Thorens TM 1600 belt driven capstan motor suggests a design compromise.

First thing I thought too Tim!

-Aaron
_____________________
https://cuttingcorporation.com




> On Apr 11, 2019, at 10:52 PM, Tim Gillett <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> This appears to be an audiophile tape machine designed  for listening to newly manufactured tape dubs of commercial releases.  A US company called The Tape Project has been offering such tapes for some years. Revox offered a probably comparable playback only machine in 2017 and I think was planning to make pre recorded tapes to go with them.  I've occasionally been asked to repair open reel tape machines for the purpose of listening to these very expensive pre recorded tapes. A tape I listened to seemed to have been competently dubbed. It would need to be for the price.
> 
> The Thorens TM 1600 belt driven capstan motor suggests a design compromise. Good direct drive capstan motor machines (electronically controlled) have been around since the late 1950's when Nagra, then Studer and Revox, Teac/Tascam, Sony, Akai etc put out their own direct drive capstan models. Direct drive motors and their electronic controls were very expensive to make back then but these days are so much cheaper to manufacture. I notice one audiophile review of ther Thorens (StereoNET UK) curiously omitted the reference to the belt drive.
> 
> Tim Gillett
> 
> Perth,
> Western Australia.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Aaron Coe" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Friday, April 12, 2019 1:29 AM
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Thorens TM 1600 ¼" Tape Machine Announced
> 
> 
> Available Summer 2020 for the low, low price of $13.5k.
> 
> https://www.thorens.com/en/thorens-news-m/231-high-end-2019-thorens-tm-1600-–-high-end-tape-machine.html
> 
> -Aaron
> _____________________
> https://cuttingcorporation.com 
> 
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