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Hey all,
Some here may be interested in listening to the New York Times Popcast from
last week. It focuses on this article and features an interview with the
author, Jody Rosen.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/13/arts/music/popcast-universal-music-fire.html?rref=collection%2Fcolumn%2Fpopcast-pop-music-podcast&action=click&contentCollection=music&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=collection
-- 
Melissa Widzinski
Audio Preservation Engineer
Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative <https://mdpi.iu.edu/>
Indiana University

On Thu, Jun 20, 2019 at 12:07 AM Jamie Howarth <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> We transferred the Alamo original vinegar mags on spec about 10 years ago,
> restored a couple reels ... so a restoration on those is certainly
> possible, and they were wow-free when finished and yeah Bob Harris will
> never get that restoration done because only ten Texans care.
>
> Big long message on Facebook by Michael Frondelli conscientious guy, ex
> Capitol archives pre Randy, now Pat Kraus, also conscientious guy..  It’s
> simply not true that they don’t have a complete accurate inventory of their
> holdings, or what was lost.
>
> My inner conspiracy theorist was that the leak came from Vivendi to drive
> the catalog’s valuation down to knock the acquisition price down. Otherwise
> it would still be a secret between UMG and the artists, as it should be.
>
> And that’s no defense of the negligence with regard to why the F the vault
> was flammable.
>
> They have been looking far and wide for cutting masters to use as safeties
> for years now
>
> Please pardon the mispellings and occassional insane word substitution I'm
> on an iPhone
>
> > On Jun 19, 2019, at 13:19, Corey Bailey <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Matt,
> >
> > Your point is well taken.
> >
> > When I was the Sound Director for MGM, we were given the task of sorting
> the sound elements from the UA library because Worldwide Services had
> mostly misinformation in their database. What we discovered, was that many
> elements were in very poor shape and if they weren't restored, transferred,
> etc., they would not be accessible the next time. These included some very
> recognizable titles like "Marty" & "The Alamo", just to name a couple.
> Worldwide Services complained about the cost & I was told to stop the
> restoration work, only to identify the elements and correct the database. I
> ultimately took the problem to the number 2 man at MGM and was told that
> there was no money to save the elements. That funding came from estimated
> revenues from after market release on a title-by-title basis. It turned out
> that this is an industry wide practice. No investment is made, by anyone,
> in maintaining what they have.
> >
> > My $0.02
> >
> > Corey
> >
> > Corey Bailey Audio Engineering
> > www.baileyzone.net
> >
> >> On 6/19/2019 8:24 AM, Matthew Snyder wrote:
> >> Alex, behind your very good question is an assumption that UMG had a
> >> complete and detailed inventory of the contents of the building in the
> >> first place. There is no reason to believe that they did. They didn't
> care
> >> enough about their holdings to invest money in protecting them, so why
> >> would they have spent money to catalog what they had and where it was?
> >> Sure, one guy had a pretty good knowledge of what was there, but that's
> not
> >> the same as a paper or database trail.
> >>
>