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The definition of "producer" is important in this case; a producer can wear
a lot of hats. Aletha Dickerson was doing A&R and arranging for Paramount
from 1927 and continued in that role at Bluebird in the 1930s. Bess Berman
was elevated to label head at Apollo from 1948 but to what extent she was
involved in producing the records her company released is unclear, Pretty
involved, it seems; enough that she was named label head rather than her
husband. But Apollo was based in New York and a lot of their recording was
done in Chicago. Did she travel, or was there someone on the Chicago end to
look after the recording? More research needed, though Roberta Freund
Schwartz would have more insight into Dickerson than I.

Dave Lewis, Virginia

On Tue, Jul 2, 2019 at 3:38 AM Nick Morgan <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> After Mary Howard, contemporary with Wilma Cozart, is Isabella Wallich,
> Fred
> Gaisberg's niece:
>
> https://www.theguardian.com/news/2001/feb/02/guardianobituaries1
>
> Nick
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Paul Stamler
> Sent: 02 July 2019 02:54
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Female producers?
>
> So it looks like the laurels for earliest female producer go to Mary
> Howard (1940s), with runners-up Wilma Cozart Fine (1950s), Joanna
> Nickrenz (1960s) and Teresa Sterne (1960s). Sound right so far?
>
> Peace,
> Paul
>
> ---
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