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You are on a hiding to nothing here - there were myriad reel-drive 
Japanese recorders around at the time, all of which were different 
between samples, never mind designs. The best approach is that you have 
already evolved. CEDAR Respeed would be a better and less intrusive 
tool, but the cost may not be justified for this application. 
Incidentally, I have found that recorded hums or drones originating in 
the recording machine are not an infallible guide to pitch variation, 
although they go some way towards straightening things out. Best to key 
to these and then apply another pass based on vocal pitch.

On 12/07/2019 19:30, J. D. Mack wrote:
> I'm looking for some advice/info.  I sometimes transfer reel-to-reel 
> tapes to CD or digital files for my customers.  Frequently, I receive 
> 3 inch tapes from the 1960s that start at one speed and gradually 
> speed up or slow down substantially as the tape plays. The speed range 
> is usually between 1 7/8 and 3 3/4, but never landing on either 
> speed.  I can correct for this using Adobe Audition's gliding stretch, 
> but it takes quite a bit of trial and error.  What sort of tape player 
> would I need to hunt down to play these tapes correctly without having 
> to resort to a software solution?  My customers never have any idea 
> what brand and model was used to make the recordings.
>

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