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State Library of Louisiana is closed as of 5:00 p.m. yesterday, with staff working remotely, and Louisiana Center for the Book included. 

 

We have cancelled our poetry month program “Just Listen to Yourself: Louisiana’s Poet Laureate Presents Louisiana Poets.”

 

This time of year is always our busiest time preparing for our fall book festival (this year on Halloween, thanks to the LSU football schedule and bye week).  We continue planning, optimistically hopeful that “this too shall pass” as we invite authors and so forth, all with the understanding that we can’t know whether we will be able to have the festival or not.  We just know that we can’t have it if we don’t prepare as usual for it now. 

 

I know firsthand from the post-Katrina experience that once this is over, people are going to need us all more than ever.  Humanities make our lives  worth living.

 

Stay well, everybody.

 

Jim

 

Jim Davis

Director of the Louisiana Center for the Book

State Library of Louisiana

701 North 4th Street

Baton Rouge, LA 70802-5232
Phone: 225-342-9714 / Fax: 225-219-9840

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From: Center for the Book state centers communication <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Lamolinara, Guy
Sent: Monday, March 23, 2020 2:36 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: working in the age of coronavirus

 

Dear Affiliates,

 

It is hard for me sometimes to believe how are lives and work activities have so drastically changed in just the past two weeks!

 

I just started teleworking last week and am still getting used to the lack of social interchange with my colleagues face-to-face. I have never teleworked before because I have always enjoyed coming into the office each day. It also puts me in a “work” mindset. The constant racket from the construction project next door is a constant and annoying distraction. If you know Alexandria, Va., and its historic district, then you know we all live in rowhouses in a densely populated neighborhood. I live in one of those rowhouses, attached on only one side. Right next door, about 12 feet away, they are erecting a large Sunrise senior living facility on what has been a parking lot for the entire 33 years I have lived in this house. At least when the times comes, I won’t have to move very far!

 

On a more serious level, I am writing to reach out and learn how all of you are coping, how your work, activities and plans have changed, and what I (and the Library of Congress) can do to support you. I can tell you we are planning to release online later this week the beginning of a series of reading and learning activities with some top authors who have agreed to work with us to reach out to young readers who are home from school. As soon as I have details, I will let you know. Perhaps it is something you can offer your users.

 

Can you tell us if you are engaging in any novel approaches to reaching your constituencies?

 

What activities have you been forced to cancel? Are you doing any virtual programming?

 

Are you involved in a state or local book festival? Are you making contingency plans?

 

Anything you would like to say to get the conversation going, please share.

 

Take care. I hope we return to “normal” soon, whatever the new normal may be.

 

Guy